Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

String Quartets Op. 77, Nos. 1 & 2 and Op. 103 (cellist). The Smithson String Quartet. EMI CDC 7-49003-2, 1988.

CD recording of the last three of Haydn’s sixty-eight string quartets, played on period instruments by the Smithson String Quartet—Jaap Schroeder and Marilyn McDonald, violins; Judson Griffin, viola; and Kenneth Slowik, cello—resident artists of the Smithsonian Chamber Music Society from 1982–1991. Slowik’s accompanying essay discusses the works and their relationship to the Op. 18 quartets of Beethoven.

String Quartets, Op. 18, Nos. 1–6 by Ludwig van Beethoven (cellist). The Smithson String Quartet. BMG/deutsche harmonia mundi 77029-2-RC, 1988.

The first period-instrument CD recordings of Beethoven’s early Op. 18 quartets, the initial six of his eventual sixteen string quartets, performed by the Smithson String Quartet—Jaap Schroeder and Marilyn McDonald, violins; Judson Griffin, viola; and Kenneth Slowik, cello—resident artists of the Smithsonian Chamber Music Society from 1982–1991. Slowik’s accompanying essay discusses the works and their relationship to the late quartets of Haydn and Mozart.

Visions of Freedom on the Great Plains: An Illustrated History of African Americans in Nebraska with Bertha Calloway. Donning Publishers, 1998.
“The Adequate Revolution,” Roundtable on Gordon Wood, The Radicalism of the American Revolution, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 51, No. 4. (Oct. 1994), 684–692.
Men and Women—A History of Costume, Gender, and Power Kathy Peiss. (Washington, D. C: NMAH, 1989).
Excerpts from a Conference to Honor William Appleman Williams with Dina Copelman, ed. Radical History Review 50 (1991), pp. 39–70.
"Markets, Streets, and Stores: Contested Terrain in Pre-industrial Boston," in Autre Temps, Autre Espace/An Other Time An Other Space, ed. Elise Marienstras and Barbara Karsky (Nancy, France: Presses universitaires de Nancy, 1986), pp. 172–97.
"Revolution in Boston," for the National Park Service handbook, Boston and the American Revolution, Boston National Historic Park and Freedom Trail (July 1998), pp. 6–73.
"The Authority of History: The Changing Public Face of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania," Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography CXIV (1990), pp. 37–66.
“Revolutionary Consent,” The Boston Review, 29 (Feb/Mar 2004), pp. 20–25.
After the Revolution: The Smithsonian History of Everyday Life in the Eighteenth Century (New York: Pantheon Press, 1985).
Museum Review, the Yorktown Victory Center, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 54, No. 2. (Apr. 1997), pp. 440–442.
Response to Nathan Huggins, "The Deforming Mirror of Truth: Slavery and the Master Narrative of American History," Radical History Review 49 (Winter 1991), pp. 56–59.
Review of “We the People: Creating a New Nation, 1765-1820,” Chicago Historical Society exhibition, The Journal of American History, Vol. 76, No. 1. (Jun. 1989), pp. 198–202.
Review of The Great River, Art and Society of the Connecticut River Valley, 1635–1820, by Gerald W. R. Ward; William N. Hosley, Jr., The New England Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 4. (Dec. 1986), 588–594.
"Food Rioters and the American Revolution," William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser., Vol. 51, No. 1. (Jan. 1994), pp. 3–38.
Review of Cary Carson, et al. Becoming Americans: Our Struggle to Be Both, in William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser. Vol. 56, No. 4. (Oct. 1999), pp. 842–847.
"From Another Site: Comments on 'Digitizing Women's History'," Radical History Review 68 (1997), pp. 121–25.
"Social Visions of the American Revolution, 1765–1775," in The Transforming Hand of Revolution: Reconsidering the Revolution as a Social Movement, ed. Ronald Hoffman and Peter J. Albert (Charlottesville, Va.: University of Virginia Press, 1995), pp. 27–57.
“A Case Study of Applied Feminist Theories,” in Gender Perspectives: Essays on Women in Museums, ed. Jane R. Glazer and Artemis A. Zenetou (Washington, D.C: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994), 137–146.
"Playful Invention, Inventive Play." International Journal of Play 5, no. 3 (July 2016): 244-261.

This peer-reviewed article shares the Lemelson Center's primary and secondary research behind the award-winning Invention at Play exhibition regarding connections among play, child development, creativity, and invention.

“Medical Alley, Minnesota (1950s): Tight-Knit Community of Tinkerers Keeps Hearts Ticking.” In Places of Invention, edited by Arthur P. Molella and Anna Karvellas, 86-109, Washington, DC Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2015.

Places of Invention tells the stories of people who lived, worked, played, collaborated, adapted, took risks, solved problems, and sometimes failed--all in the pursuit of something new. It dispels the myth of the lone inventor and shows that invention and innovation abound--not just in the Silicon Valleys of America but in hometowns across the country.

Journal of Museum Education Co-published by the Museum Education Roundtable and Left Coast Press.

Monica Smith served as the Editor in Chief of  the Journal of Museum Education from 2005 to 2008.

"Invention at Play: An Award-winning Traveling Exhibition" In Museums at Play: Games, Interaction and Learning, edited by Katy Beale, 440-58. Edinburgh, Scotland: MuseumsEtc., 2011.

This chapter examines how the Lemelson Center's first major exhibition evolved into an exhibition focused on play, and the research, implementation, and evaluation processes along the way, to hopefully provide inspiration for future play-related museum initiatives.

"From Frying Pan to Flying V: The Rise of the Electric Guitar" With Gary Sturm. Original website 1997; redesigned 2014.

This virtual exhibition features instruments that illustrate how innovative makers and players combined the guitar with a pickup and amplifier to create a new instrument and a new sound that profoundly changed popular music—blues, country, rhythm and blues, jazz, and rock and roll—in the 20th-century. From an exhibition produced by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, November 1996 through October 1997.

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