Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"A Sense of Place: Donald Worster’s Dust Bowl." Technology and Culture 48 (April 2007): 377–85.
Mixing the Waters: Environment, Politics, and the Building of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. Akron, Ohio: The University of Akron Press, 1993.

This history of the largest and most controversial water project ever built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers interweaves analyses of changing environmental values, engineering, and pork-barrel politics. Recipient of the Public Works Historical Society’s 1994 Abel Wolman Award and the 1995 Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award.

"John Lucian Savage." In Dictionary of American Biography, supplement 8, 572–73. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1988.

A biographical sketch of the prominent U.S. Bureau of Reclamation engineer who designed scores of high dams in the American West, including the record-setting Hoover Dam on the Colorado River.

“Placing Environmental History on Display.” Environmental History 7 (October 2002): 566–88.

Discusses how and why environmental history should be integrated into exhibitions developed at both cultural and scientific institutions. The essay is a revised version of the author’s presidential address before the American Society for Environmental History.

"Carmen E. Turner." APWA Reporter 60 (February 1993): 26–27. (Reprinted in People Making Public Works History: A Century of Progress, 1894–1994, edited by Robert D. Bugher, 336-37. Kansas City, Mo.: American Public Works Association, 1998.)

A biographical sketch of the first woman to manage a major transit system in the United States. Turner headed the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority from 1983 to 1990.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environmental Issues in the Twentieth Century: A Bibliography. with Michael C. Robinson, eds. Environmental History Series. Washington: GPO, 1984.

A compilation of books, articles, government reports, newspaper stories, and unpublished items that address the environmental implications of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ civil works and regulatory activities.

“The Green House.” Forum for Applied Research and Public Policy 15 (Fall 2000): 113–14.

A review essay of Dennis L. Soden’s edited book, The Environmental Presidency, which deals with the changing attitudes and actions toward natural resources among America’s chief executives.

"Scientific Instrumentation as an Element of U.S. Science Policy: National Science Foundation Support of Chemistry Instrumentation." In Invisible Connections: Instruments, Institutions, and Science, edited by Robert Bud and Susan E. Cozzens, 238–63. Bellingham, Wash.: SPIE Optical Engineering Press, 1992.

A history of the U.S. government’s support of chemistry instrumentation, 1950–1990.

"Regulating Wetlands in the 1970s: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Organizations." Journal of Forest History 27 (April 1983): 60–75.

A history of how the federal government came to regulate the destruction of wetlands in the United States and the unsuccessful efforts of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to restrict the new police responsibilities entrusted to it. Recipient of the Forest History Society’s 1984 Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser Award.

“George Washington Goethals.” In American National Biography, vol. 9, 163–65. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

A biographical sketch of the civil engineer best known for his work on the Panama Canal.

"Knowledge Collaborations in the Arts, the Sciences, and the Humanities: Edited Excerpts from a Smithsonian Seminar Series—Part 2: The Sciences." Knowledge: Creation, Diffusion, Utilization 13 (June 1992): 399–406.

A historical overview of the patterns of collaboration among investigators in different fields of science and how federal science policy has attempted to account for those changes.

“Technical Advice for Congress: Past Trends and Present Obstacles” with Bruce L. R. Smith. In Science and Technology Advice for Congress, edited by M. Granger Morgan and Jon M. Peha, 23–52. Washington: RFF Press, 2003.

An examination of the U. S. Congress’s evolving need for scientific and technical advice, the inherent difficulties in fulfilling this need, and a historical assessment of the mechanisms put in place to provide the legislative branch with independent technical counsel.

"Russell G. Cone." In Dictionary of American Biography, supplement 7, 135–36. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1981.

A biographical sketch of the civil engineer involved in the design and construction of several major suspension bridges in the United States, including San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge.

“APWA: Using History to Advance Appreciation of Public Works.” APWA Reporter 79 (June 2012): 86-87.

Reflections on how popular opinions about the appropriate role of public enterprises have devolved since the founding of the American Public Works Association in 1937, and how historical inquiry can contribute to society’s understanding of this trend and its consequences.

"Environmental Politics in the American South: The Fight over the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway." Environmental History Review 15 (Spring 1991): 1–24.

Analyzes the maturation of environmentalism in the American South during the 1970s as expressed in the opposition to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ massive waterway in Mississippi and Alabama. Recipient of the Society for History in the Federal Government’s 1992 James Madison Prize.

“Personal Beliefs and National Stories: Theater in Museums as a Tool for Exploring Historical Memory.” Curator: The Museum Journal, No. 2 (April 2013), 189-197. bibliography
"A Passion for Strawberries, A Profile of Anne Wood Murray Collector Extraordinaire," in Piecework, March/April 2002.
"Stabroek Market and the Public Clocks of the Co-Operative Republic of Guyana" with David H. Shayt. Washington, D.C., Smithsonian Institution, 1991.

A study of the Stabroek Market in Georgetown, Guyana, and of clocks and bells on other public buildings in the republic.

"Stabroek Market and the Public Clocks of the Co-Operative Republic of Guyana" with David H. Shayt. Washington, D.C., Smithsonian Institution, 1991.

A study of the Stabroek Market in Georgetown, Guyana, and of clocks and bells on other public buildings in the republic.

"An Early Factory Clock by Benjamin & Truman Hanks," with Richard Perlman. Bulletin, National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Columbia, PA. February 1997. Vol.39/1, No. 306, pp. 21–29.

A study and description of a rare and important American mill clock purchased by NMAH.

"An Early Factory Clock by Benjamin & Truman Hanks" with Richard Perlman. Bulletin, National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Columbia, Pa. February 1997. Vol.39/1, No. 306, pp. 21–29.

A study and description of a rare and important American mill clock purchased by NMAH.

"Keeping Time in Guyana," with David H. Shayt. Americas, Vol. 49, No. 6., Nov–Dec 1997, pp. 6–13. Washington, D.C.

Attitudes to public timekeeping in present-day Guyana. Perception of time in the British colonies.

"Keeping Time in Guyana" with David H. Shayt. Americas, Vol. 49, No. 6., Nov–Dec 1997, pp. 6–13. Washington, D.C.

Attitudes to public timekeeping in present-day Guyana. Perception of time in the British colonies.

A Renaissance Treasury: The Flagg Collection of European Decorative Arts and Sculpture. by Laurie Winters. New York, Hudson Hills Press, 1999. pp. 25–45.

Catalogue entries and comments on the clocks in the Flagg Collection, as part of a larger catalog for a travelling exhibition.

Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2016.

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