Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

“From the Fair to the Family,” in From Receiver to Remote Control: The T.V. Set. New York: New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1990, pp. 63–70.
“A Suggestion Concerning James Smithson’s Concept of ‘Increase and Diffusion,’” Technology and Culture 24 (April 1983): pp. 246–255.
Design for Victory: World War II Posters on the American Home Front with Harry R. Rubenstein. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1998.

This study delves beneath the surface of colorful poster graphics, telling the stories behind their production and revealing how posters fulfilled the goals and needs of their creators. The authors describe the history of how specific posters were conceived and received, focusing on the workings of the wartime advertising profession and demonstrating how posters often reflected uneasy relations between labor and management.

America's Doll House: The Miniature World of Faith Bradford. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2010.

One of the most popular exhibits at the Smithsonian Institution is a dollhouse. Sitting on the National Museum of American History's third floor is a five-story home donated to the museum by Faith Bradford, a Washington, D.C., librarian, who spent more than a half-century accumulating and constructing the 1,354 miniatures that fill its 23 intricately detailed rooms. When Bradford donated them to the museum in 1951, she wrote a lengthy manuscript describing the lives of its residents: Mr. and Mrs. Peter Doll and their ten children, two visiting grandparents, twenty pets, and household staff. Bradford cataloged the Dolls' tastes, habits, and preferences in neatly typed household inventories, which she then bound, along with photographs and fabric samples, in a scrapbook. In America's Doll House, Smithsonian curator William L. Bird, Jr., weaves this visual material into the rich tapestry of Faith Bradford's miniature world. featuring vibrant color photography that brings every narrative detail to life, America's Doll House is both an incisive portrait of a sentimental pastime and a celebration of Bradford's remarkable and painstaking accomplishment.

“Advertising, Company Voice.” “Cavalcade of America.” “General Electric Theater.” In Horace Newcomb, ed. Encyclopedia of Television. Chicago and London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 1997.
“Better Living”: Advertising, Media, and the New Vocabulary of Business Leadership, 1935-1955. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1999.

A history of how big business learned to be both entertaining and persuasive when talking to the public. Examining the years from the Depression to postwar prosperity, "Better Living" follows the dissemination of a politically competitive claim of "more," "new" and "better" in industry and life. Beginning with the changes in business-government relations during the New Deal, this study looks at the ways in which politically active corporations and their leaders learned how to speak--when speaking was not enough.

“Television in the Ike Age,” in Keith Melder, Hail to the Candidate: Presidential Campaigns from Banners to Broadcasts. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992.
"American Family Robinson," "Cavalcade of America," "Theatre Guild on the Air," in Christopher Sterling, ed. The Museum of Broadcast Communications Encyclopedia of Radio. Chicago and London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 2003.
"Publishing the U.S. Exploring Expedition: The Fruits of the Glorious Enterprise" in Printing History (January 2008)

This article discusses the Congressional and east coast print production and printing of the volumes describing the findings of the U.S. Exploring Expedition (1838-42).

 

American Musical Theater, Vols. 1-4. (annotator and producer) Washington, D.C. and New York, NY: Smithsonian/CBS, 1989. 4 compact discs and 120-page booklet; bibliog.; discog.

This collection of original cast recordings includes book with historical essay and extensive annotations on each selection.

Star-Spangled Rhythm: Voices of Broadway and Hollywood, Vols. 1-4 (annotator and producer). Washington, D.C. and New York, NY: Smithsonian/BMG, 1996. Four compact discs with 80-page booklet; bibliog.; discog.

The history of the American musical is conveyed through 66 archival recordings of songs from stage and screen and textual annotation.

Red Hot and Blue: A Smithsonian Salute to the American Musical with Amy Henderson. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1996.

Based on the 1996 Smithsonian exhibition with the same title, the text offers a collective biography of the artists and craftspeople who created the American musical on stage and screen.

I Got Rhythm: The Music of George Gershwin, Vols. 1-4 (annotator and producer). Washington, D.C. and New York, NY: Smithsonian/BMG, 1995. Four compact discs with 64-page booklet; bibliog..; discog.
From This Moment On: Songs of Cole Porter, Vols. 1-4 (annotator and producer) Washington, D.C. and New York, NY: Smithsonian/SONY, 1992. 4 compact discs with 60-page booklet; bibliog..; discog.

Cole Porter’s work for the international musical stage and screen is chronicled in 84 archival recordings and textual annotation.

Fascinating Rhythm: The Broadway Gershwin, 1919-1933 (annotator) 1 compact disc with program booket. New York: BMG Classics, 1998.

This archival recording focuses on remastered 78’s made by Victor Recording Company artists in the 1920s and 1930s.

"And Now For Something Completely Different: Reconstructing Duke Ellington's Beggar's Holiday for Presentation in a Museum Setting." in Exhibiting Dilemmas: Issues of Representation at the Smithsonian, Amy Henderson and Adrienne Kaeppler, eds. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1996; pp. 262–72.

Essay on applying the exhibition experience to research and collections involving the performing arts, specifically in the archival reconstruction/museum performance of Duke Ellington's 1946 musical play, Beggar's Holiday.

Music of the New York Stage, Vols. 1-4 (annotator) London, England: Pearl Recordings, 1994.12 compact discs with 10-page booklets for each volume.

The earliest sound recordings of American musical theater artists is the focus for this recorded anthology.

American Popular Song, Vols. 1-5 (annotator with James Morris and J. R. Taylor). Washington, D.C. and New York, NY: Smithsonian/CBS, 1984. 5 compact discs and 120-page booklet; bibliog..; discog.

An anthology of this distinctly national art form includes 110 selected archival recordings of classic popular songs and textual annotations.

The Ultimate Broadway Composers, Vols. 1-12. (annotator). 12 compact discs with program booklets. London, England: Pearl Recordings, 2000-04.

This 12-volume series is devoted to rare original cast recordings of musicals by Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, and Sigmund Romberg.

American Songbooks, Vols. 1-24. (annotator and producer) Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian, 1993-5. 24 compact discs with booklets.

The legacy of American songwriters is traced through this recording series with individual volumes devoted to Harold Arlen, Irving Berlin, Hoagy Carmichael, Cy Coleman, Duke Ellington, Dorothy Fields, George Gershwin, Oscar Hammerstein II, E. Y. Harburg, Jerome Kern, Alan Jay Lerner, Frank Loesser, Johnny Mercer, Cole Porter, Andy Razaf, Arthur Schwartz, Jule Styne, James Van Heusen, Fats Waller, Harry Warren, Kurt Weill, Richard Whiting, Alec Wilder, Vincent Youmans.

“The National Puppet Collection,” in American Puppetry: Collections, History and Performance. Eds. Phyllis Dircks, Steve Abrams. New York: American Theater Library Association, 2004.
American Quilts (Smithsonian Treasury). Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.
Albright, Madeleine. Madam Secretary: A Memoir, Miramax; (September 16, 2003) 2003.
The Year in Pictures, Life magazine, Jan. 1985.
Alexander, Jane. Command Performance: An Actress in the Theater of Politics, Public Affairs Press (DC); 1st edition (May 30, 2000).

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