The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

African American Photographers in Segregated America

Illustrated blog in Smithsonian Collections Blog.  A reflection about photographs of Eddie "Rochester" Anderson and Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in Clyde Stauffer's snapshot album, compiled during travels to V.F.W. posts.

“American Photographs in Europe and Illusions of Travel,” American Photographs in Europe, ed. by David Nye and Mick Gidley. Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Amsterdam: VU University Press, 1994, pp. 57–75.

A discussion of the interrelationship of stereograph publisher Underwood & Underwood's European sales activities and its stereoscopic documentation of Europe for both the American and European markets.

“Barbara Beirne’s Women of Southern Appalachia,” Now and Then (The Center for Appalachian Studies and Services, East Tennessee State University), Summer 1997, pp. 3–7.

A description of Barbara Beirne's aims in interviewing and photographing a number of energetic, courageous Appalachian women and how these documents highlight important aspects of Appalachian cultural, social, and economic history.

“The Archives Center and Photography: National Museum of American History,” History of Photography, Spring 2000 (Vol. 24, No. 1), p. 49.

A description of the Archives Center's photographic collections, policies, and programs, with emphasis on major recent acquisitions, such as the Scurlock Studio Records.

“The Scurlock Ninety-Year Project: Black Washington in Black America,” Exposure, vol. 32:1 (1999), pp. 64–73.

A summary of the history of the Scurlock Studio and a description of the the Museum's Scurlock collection, with remarks about conservation challenges, especially regarding deteriorating acetate negatives.

“Wayward Wife as Muse: Anais Nin and Ian Hugo,” in Anais Nin: A Book of Mirrors, ed. by Paul Herron. Huntington Woods, Mich.: Sky Blue Press, 1996, pp. 44–57.

A critical appraisal of the influence of diarist and surrealist Anais Nin on the films of her husband Ian Hugo. Nin served as muse, model, actress, and collaborator in inspiring Hugo to become a creative artist.

“Souvenirs of Roads Not Taken: Virtual Travel with the Underwood & Underwood Travel System and the World Wide Web,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 131–139.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism details the ways in which commercially published stereographs were used to simulate travel experiences, 1895-1921.

“Labyrinthine Walk: A Guide for Politically Incorrect Tourists,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 141–157.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism analyzes the goals of tourists when visiting museums as part of a sight-seeing ritual.

“Betty Hahn: The Early Years,” essay in Betty Hahn: Photography or Maybe Not, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1995.

This essay describes the influence of Hahn's graduate school photography professor, Henry Holmes Smith, on her early work, including her revival of "obsolete" photographic processes such as gum-bichromate. Her technical and aesthetic experiments are described.

“Automatic Photobooths in Context(s),” foreword in Nakki Goranin, American Photobooth.   New York:  W.W. Norton & Co., Feb. 2008, pp. 9-13.

A psychological and cultural meditation about the unique experience of photobooth photographs, with notes about the NMAH Hall of Photography’s photobooth.

"The Scurlock Studio: A Biography," (with Donna M. Wells), Picturing the Promise: The Scurlock Studio and Black Washington.  Washington, D.C.: National Museum of African American History and Culture in collaboration with the National Museum of American history, 2009, pp. 196-212.

A history of the Scurlock family studio and its significance for the African American community of Washington.

"Objects in an Exhibition: Reflections on 'Fast Attacks and Boomers." In Materializing the Military. Artefacts VI: Military Technology, ed. Bernard Finn and Barton C. Hacker. London: Science Museum Press, in press

On several key objects in an exhibition on submarines in the Cold War and how they contributed to the exhibition theme

“Fast Attacks and Boomers: A Museum Presentation of Cold War Military History.” World Archaeology Congress, Washington, June 2003.

On the unusual organization of the exhibition team, stressing its efforts to display nuclear submarine development and operations in the context of the Cold War.

World Military History Annotated Bibliography: Premodern and Nonwestern Military Institutions and Warfare (Works published before 1967). History of Warfare, vol. 27. Leiden: Brill, 2005.

Annotated bibliography of works published before 1967.

An Annotated Index to Volumes 1 through 25 of “Technology and Culture” 1959–1984. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1991.

Includes author, title, and subject indexes, with annotation for all articles.

“A Note on Sources: Remarks upon Receiving the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, 18 October 2003.” Technology and Culture 45 (2004): 137–41.

On the author’s intellectual history.

"Women and Military Institutions in Early Modern Europe: A Reconnaissance." Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 6 (1981): 643–71.

Women played important and indispensable military support roles in European and American armies from the 15th through the early 19th centuries.

“The Machines of War: European Military Technology in the Twentieth Century.” Technology and History, in press.

Military technological change greatly influenced the course of European and American history in the 20th century.

"Engineering a New Order: Military Institutions, Technical Education, and the Rise of the Industrial State." Technology and Culture 33 (1993): 1–27.

Military concerns greatly influenced the development of engineering and engineering education in the 18th and 19th centuries, with important consequences for 19th-century industrialization.

"Fortunes of War: From Primitive Warfare to Nuclear Weapons in Anthropological Thought.” In The Cultural Shaping of Violence, ed. Myrdene Anderson. West Lafayette, Ind.: Purdue University Press, in press.

How anthropology and archaeology have dealt with war since the 19th century.

"Military Institutions, Weapons, and Social Change: Toward a New History of Military Technology." Technology and Culture 35 (1994): 768–834.

On the historiography of military technology, including the role of museums.

“Gunpowder and the Changing Military Order: The Islamic Gunpowder Empires, ca. 1450–ca. 1650.” In The Heirs of Archimedes: Technology, Science and Warfare, 1350–1800, ed. Brett D. Steele and Tamera L. Dorland. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, in press.

The adoption of gunpowder weapons tended to strengthen central governments against regional powers.

"Technology and Research." In Encyclopedia of the American Military, ed. John J. Jessup and Louise B. Ketz, 1373–1414. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1994.

Overview of the development of American military technology, from colonial times to the present.

“Military Science.” In Cambridge History of Modern Science, vol. 8, Science in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, ed. David Livingstone and Ronald L. Numbers et al. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, in press.

Links between military and scientific institutions expanded and intensified during the 19th and 20th centuries.

"Engineering and Science." In Encyclopedia of the American Military, ed John J. Jessup and Louise B. Ketz, 1415–44. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1994.

Overview of relationships between science, engineering, and American military institutions, from colonial times to the present.