Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

“The 400–Years War: Conquest and Acculturation in the Military Struggle for North America.” In Coming to the Americas: The Eurasian Military Impact on the Development of North America, ed. John Lynn, 107–35. Wheaton, IL: Cantigny First Division Foundation, 2003.

Until the 19th century, North American Indians successfully confined European settlement to the area east of the Appalachians and south of the Great Plains by adapting European technology and exploiting European enmities.

"Science and Technology in the Nineteenth Century." In A Guide to the Sources of United States Military History: Supplement IV, ed.Robin Higham and Donald J. Mrozek, 82–117. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1998.

Bibliographical essay focused on recent scholarship on the interaction of science and technology with American military institutions in the 19th century.

“The World of Camp and Train: The Changing Role of Women in Early Modern Armies.” with Margaret Vining. In Sovereign Arms: Armies and Fleets in the World between Lepanto and the French Revolution, 1571–1789, Rome, 2002.

On the necessary and vital roles women served in supporting the activities of early modern armies.

“Fast Attacks and Boomers: A Museum Presentation of Cold War Military History.” World Archaeology Congress, Washington, June 2003.

On the unusual organization of the exhibition team, stressing its efforts to display nuclear submarine development and operations in the context of the Cold War.

"Military Institutions and the Labor Process: Noneconomic Sources of Technological Change, Women's Subordination, and the Organization of Work." with Sally L. Hacker. Technology and Culture 28 (1987): 743–75.

Society and economy are as much products as causes of military and technological change.

“From Camp Follower to Lady in Uniform: Women, Social Class and Military Institutions before 1920.” with Margaret Vining. Contemporary European History 10 (2001): 353–73.

Relationships between women and military institutions altered radically from the mid-19th century to World War I, reflecting the changing social status of both women and the military.

“A Note on Sources: Remarks upon Receiving the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, 18 October 2003.” Technology and Culture 45 (2004): 137–41.

On the author’s intellectual history.

“Volunteers Inspired by Conscription: Uniformed Women in World War I.” with Margaret Vining. In Total War, Total Defense, 1789–1900, ed. Per Iko et al., 346–52. Stockholm: Svenska militärhistorika kommissionen, 2001.

Civilian women in large numbers volunteered for military-related health and welfare services in World War I, donning military-style uniforms as a symbolic claim to full citizenship.

“The Machines of War: European Military Technology in the Twentieth Century.” Technology and History, in press.

Military technological change greatly influenced the course of European and American history in the 20th century.

“The Convergence of History and Military Museums,” with Margaret Vining. In Acta of the Asociacion de amigos de los museos militares, Madrid, Nov. 2003, in press.

Military museums and history museums arose from distinct traditions, but in recent years have come increasingly to share common views on how to exhibition military history.

"Uniforms Make the Woman." with Margaret Vining. In Materializing the Military. Artefacts VI: Military Technology, ed. Bernard Finn and Barton C. Hacker. London: Science Museum Press, in press

In the 1920s, a Smithsonian exhibition of women's uniforms validated women's World War I contributions and expanded political roles.

“Western Military Technology and East Asian Modernization in the 19th Century.” In Modernization in China and East Asia, 1850–1950, ed. Edouard Vermeer and Dong Zhenghue, in press.

Adoption of Western weapons played a key role in the modernization of East Asian states.

Patent Models in the Graphic Arts Collection, (Washington, DC: National Museum of American History, 1997).

Lists Graphic Arts Collection patent models from the following groups: Printing presses and stamps; Press-related apparatus; Compositors' tools; Type; Plate, stone, and block making; Bookbinding; Copying and autographic printing (with stencils and pantographs); Picture framing; Miscellaneous.

The Boy and His Press. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American History, 1992.

Amateur and young printers in the 19th century.

“Perishable: Handle with Care.” Museum News. Vol. 56, No. 2, November/December 1977.

An article outlining guidelines for handling historic costumes delivered in a question and answer format. Also includes basics on storage, cleaning, labeling of costume as well as environmental elements.

Costume Display Techniques. Nashville, Tennessee: American Association for State and Local History, 1977.

A book presenting an overview of preparing costumes for display to include selecting costumes for exhibition, conservation and treatment, methods of display, supports for display forms, dressing costumes, environmental conditions in display areas, and costume bibliographies. Includes appendixes and illustrations.

"Above the Boundary: The Development of Kalorama and Washington Heights, 1872–1900," Washington History 14:2 (fall/winter 2002).

The transformation of Kalorama Heights and Washington Heights from private estates into streets and houses is presented as a case study of the process, pace, and limits of Washington, D.C.'s suburban expansion in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.

"The Evil of the Misfit Subdivisions: Creating the Permanent System of Highways of the District of Columbia," Washington History 14:1 (spring/summer 2002).

An examination of efforts in the 1880s and 1890s to create a master street plan for those parts of the District of Columbia outside the cities of Washington and Georgetown. The resulting Permanent System of Highways guided the city's growth during the twentieth century.

"A Catalog of Suburban Subdivisions of the District of Columbia, 1854–1902," with Matthew B. Gilmore. Washington History 14:2 (fall/winter 2002).

A catalog covering 176 major subdivisions of land made outside the city of Washington between 1854 and 1902, compiled out of the records of the D.C. Surveyor's Office. The information was gathered to provide modern researchers with a starting point for tracing the origins of District neighborhoods outside Florida Avenue and east of the Anacostia River.

Teacher’s Guide to Jazz: The First Century. Alexandria, Va.: The author, 2000. 64 pp., bibliog.

A guide for college professors to Jazz: The First Century, featuring 500 discussion and test questions (and answers); and chapter-by-chapter recommendations for further reading.

Ragtime: Its History, Composers, and Music. New York: Schirmer Books, 1985; London: Macmillan, 1985 and 1986. Cloth and paper ed.s, x + 400 pp., bibliog., discog., illus., music, photos, tables.

An overview of ragtime, with chapters covering the history (e.g., jazz and classical music), leading figures (Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton), and its music.

Beyond Category: The Musical Genius of Duke Ellington; The Best of Ellington from Victor, Bluebird, and RCA, 1927–1967, (producer and annotator). Two compact discs (or cassettes) with 28-page booklet. Washington: Smithsonian Collection of Recordings; New York: BMG Records, 1994.

An anthology of the best Ellington recordings, from his Cotton Club years (Black and Tan Fantasie, Mood Indigo, and his early-1940s recordings (Ko-Ko, Concerto for Cootie), to his late-career recordings (Far East Suite, Concert of Sacred Music).

The Classic Hoagy Carmichael (producer and annotator). Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Collection of Recordings; Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society; London, England: BBC Records, 1988. Four 12" LPs, boxed, with a 64-page book, bibliog., discog., filmog., illus. Also issued on cassette and CD.

Spanning 60 years of recordings, from 1927–1987, this anthology presents 57 classic recordings of songs composed by Hoagy Carmichael, including Stardust, Skylark, Lazy River, Georgia On My Mind, and Rockin’ Chair, as recorded by Louis Armstrong, Artie Shaw, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles, Carmichael himself, and others.

“Duke Ellington: The Smithsonian Will Preserve and Perpetuate Duke Ellington's Legacy,” Jazz Educators Journal 22, no. 1 (January 1990), 24–27.

Describes the scope of the huge Duke Ellington Collection acquired by the NMAH in 1988, and the Museum’s plans to catalog it and present it to the public.

“Ellington at 100: Genius Beyond Category,” Jazz Educators Journal, March 1999, pp. 32–37, 39–40.

Discusses the genius of Ellington, his increasing recognition by colleges and concert halls, and the Smithsonian’s extensive set of initiatives to interpret his legacy, including exhibitions, fellowships, performance programs, publications, and radio broadcasts.

Pages