Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"D.I.Y Education Before YouTube" New York Times, July 11, 2015
The Virgin Vote: How Young Americans Made Democracy Social, Politics Personal, and Voting Popular in the Nineteenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.
"Was Abolitionism a Failure?" New York Times, January 30, 2015.
"Don't Throw the Bums Out" New York Times, September 12, 2014
"How Coffee Fueled the Civil War," New York Times, July 9, 2014
The Virgin Vote: How Young Americans Made Democracy Social, Politics Personal, and Voting Popular in the Nineteenth Century Forthcoming, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.

The Virgin Vote uncovers the forgotten role young men and women played in American politics from 1840 through 1900. Drawing on hundreds of unpublished diaries and letters – by barmaids and belles, sharecroppers and cowboys – it explores the way children, youths, and young adults used democracy to win maturity. At the same time, parents and politicians trained children to be “violent little partisans” and pushed young men to assert their masculinity by casting their “virgin votes” at age twenty-one, pushing voter turnouts to historic peaks. On a personal level, youths used democracy to win adulthood, while on a structural level politicians used youths to maintain political power.

"The Wild Children of Yesteryear" New York Times, May 31, 2014
"D.I.Y. Education Before YouTube," The New York Times, July 11, 2015.
"Anxious Youth, Then and Now" New York Times, December 31, 2013
"Was Abolitionism a Failure?" The New York Times, January 30, 2015.
"When the Civil War Came to New York," New York Times, July 13, 2013
“American Photographs in Europe and Illusions of Travel,” American Photographs in Europe, ed. by David Nye and Mick Gidley. Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Amsterdam: VU University Press, 1994, pp. 57–75.

A discussion of the interrelationship of stereograph publisher Underwood & Underwood's European sales activities and its stereoscopic documentation of Europe for both the American and European markets.

African American Photographers in Segregated America

Illustrated blog in Smithsonian Collections Blog.  A reflection about photographs of Eddie "Rochester" Anderson and Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in Clyde Stauffer's snapshot album, compiled during travels to V.F.W. posts.

“The Archives Center and Photography: National Museum of American History,” History of Photography, Spring 2000 (Vol. 24, No. 1), p. 49.

A description of the Archives Center's photographic collections, policies, and programs, with emphasis on major recent acquisitions, such as the Scurlock Studio Records.

“The Scurlock Ninety-Year Project: Black Washington in Black America,” Exposure, vol. 32:1 (1999), pp. 64–73.

A summary of the history of the Scurlock Studio and a description of the the Museum's Scurlock collection, with remarks about conservation challenges, especially regarding deteriorating acetate negatives.

“Wayward Wife as Muse: Anais Nin and Ian Hugo,” in Anais Nin: A Book of Mirrors, ed. by Paul Herron. Huntington Woods, Mich.: Sky Blue Press, 1996, pp. 44–57.

A critical appraisal of the influence of diarist and surrealist Anais Nin on the films of her husband Ian Hugo. Nin served as muse, model, actress, and collaborator in inspiring Hugo to become a creative artist.

“Souvenirs of Roads Not Taken: Virtual Travel with the Underwood & Underwood Travel System and the World Wide Web,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 131–139.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism details the ways in which commercially published stereographs were used to simulate travel experiences, 1895-1921.

“Labyrinthine Walk: A Guide for Politically Incorrect Tourists,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 141–157.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism analyzes the goals of tourists when visiting museums as part of a sight-seeing ritual.

“Automatic Photobooths in Context(s),” foreword in Nakki Goranin, American Photobooth.   New York:  W.W. Norton & Co., Feb. 2008, pp. 9-13.

A psychological and cultural meditation about the unique experience of photobooth photographs, with notes about the NMAH Hall of Photography’s photobooth.

“Betty Hahn: The Early Years,” essay in Betty Hahn: Photography or Maybe Not, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1995.

This essay describes the influence of Hahn's graduate school photography professor, Henry Holmes Smith, on her early work, including her revival of "obsolete" photographic processes such as gum-bichromate. Her technical and aesthetic experiments are described.

"The Scurlock Studio: A Biography," (with Donna M. Wells), Picturing the Promise: The Scurlock Studio and Black Washington.  Washington, D.C.: National Museum of African American History and Culture in collaboration with the National Museum of American history, 2009, pp. 196-212.

A history of the Scurlock family studio and its significance for the African American community of Washington.

“Barbara Beirne’s Women of Southern Appalachia,” Now and Then (The Center for Appalachian Studies and Services, East Tennessee State University), Summer 1997, pp. 3–7.

A description of Barbara Beirne's aims in interviewing and photographing a number of energetic, courageous Appalachian women and how these documents highlight important aspects of Appalachian cultural, social, and economic history.

"Objects in an Exhibition: Reflections on 'Fast Attacks and Boomers." In Materializing the Military. Artefacts VI: Military Technology, ed. Bernard Finn and Barton C. Hacker. London: Science Museum Press, in press

On several key objects in an exhibition on submarines in the Cold War and how they contributed to the exhibition theme

“A Note on Sources: Remarks upon Receiving the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, 18 October 2003.” Technology and Culture 45 (2004): 137–41.

On the author’s intellectual history.

West Point in the Making of America. with Margaret Vining. Irvington, N.Y.: Hydra, 2002.

Catalog of the West Point in the Making of America exhibition.

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