Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"The Wreck of America’s First Yacht: Cleopatra’s Barge (Ha ’aheo o Hawaii): 1995 Survey," in Stephen R. James, Jr. (ed.), Underwater Archaeology Proceedings from the Society for Historical Archaeology Conference. Cincinnati, Ohio: Society for Historical Archaeology, 1996. 61–66.

Highlights of the 1995 survey for—and discovery of—the Royal Hawaiian Yacht.

Underwater Archaeology Proceedings from The Society For Historical Archaeology Conference. Washington, D.C.: Society for Historical Archaeology, 1995.

An edited volume of current (1995) underwater archaeological research (mostly fieldwork).

"DOWNBOUND: The History of the Early Great Lakes Propeller Indiana," The American Neptune 55.4 (1995) 323–355. Awarded the Great Lakes History Prize, July 1996.

History of one of the earliest propeller-driven steamboats in the Great Lakes, the propulsion machinery of which was
raised by the Smithsonian in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

“Washington, D.C.: The Smithsonian Institution,” SHA Newsletter 34.1 (Spring 2001) 27.

A brief discussion of maritime archaeological research at the Smithsonian.

“The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.,” in Peter Neill (ed.), Great Maritime Museums of the World. New York: Harry Abrams and Balsam Press, 1991. pp. 278–289

An overview of the 19th century origins of the Smithsonian’s maritime collections and a discussion of its highlights.

"The wreck of the 1848 propeller Indiana: interim report," with David S. Robinson. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 22.3 (1993) 219–235.

Archaeology of one of the earliest propeller-driven steamboats in the Great Lakes, the propulsion machinery of which was raised by the Smithsonian in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

The Maritime Administration Collection of Ship Plans (1939–1970) with Paula J. Johnson (eds.) Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1995.

A catalog of Smithsonian ship plans available to the public.

"The Wreck of the Steamboat Indiana," Bermuda Journal of Archaeology and Maritime History 5 (1993) 181–192.

History and archaeology of one of the earliest propeller-driven steamboats in the Great Lakes.

"Downbound: Exploring the Wreck of the Indiana," Michigan History Magazine 77.5 (September/October 1993) 24–30.

General-interest account of one of the earliest propeller-driven steamboats in the Great Lakes.

“The End of the Age of Sail: Merchant Shipping in the Nineteenth Century,” in George F. Bass (ed.), Ships and Shipwrecks of the Americas. London: Thames and Hudson, 1988. Chapter 12: pp. 231–50.

An historical and archaeological synthesis, with an emphasis on the knowledge gained from period shipwrecks.

The Maritime Administration Collection of Ship Plans (1939–1970). with Paula J. Johnson (eds.) Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, 1995.

A catalog of Smithsonian ship plans available to the public.

"Escape by Water: The Smithsonian Institution’s Ship Plans Catalogs," Seaways IV.3 (May/June 1993) 32–35. Reprinted in Messing About in Boats 11.18 (1 Feb. 1994) 6–8.

Description of the Smithsonian’s three ship plans catalogs.

“The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.,” in Peter Neill (ed.), Great Maritime Museums of the World. New York: Harry Abrams and Balsam Press, 1991. pp. 278–89

An overview of the 19th century origins of the Smithsonian’s maritime collections and a discussion of its highlights.

"Treasure Salvage, Archaeological Ethics and Maritime Museums," International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 22.1 (1993) 53–60. Reprinted in Prott et al., Background Materials on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (Paris: UNESCO, 2000) 393–401.

A discussion of the ethics of collecting artifacts from shipwrecks.

"The End of the Age of Sail: Merchant Shipping in the Nineteenth Century," in George F. Bass (ed.), Ships and Shipwrecks of the Americas. London: Thames and Hudson, 1988. Chapter 12: pp. 231–50.
"Maritime Museum Policy and the Acquisition of Archaeological Materials," Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 16.1 (1992) 15–18.

A discussion of the ethics of collecting artifacts from ship wrecks.

Proceedings of the Sixteenth Conference on Underwater Archaeology, (ed.). Pleasant Hill, Calif: Society for Historical Archaeology, 1986. SHA Special Publications Series No. 4.

An edited volume of underwater archaeological research (mostly fieldwork).

Legacies: Collecting America's History at the Smithsonian with Steven Lubar. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2001.

Explores changing ideas about what is worth saving from the American past through an illustrated history of the National Museum of American History's collections, featuring over 250 objects.

"Looking at Artifacts, Thinking about History." with Steven Lubar. Artifact & Analysis: A Teacher’s Guide to Interpreting Objects and Writing History. Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies and the National Museum of American History, 2001.

Discusses the value of artifacts in studying the past, and presents five ways to think about artifacts in history. Part of a teacher's guide developed for Advanced Placement Program U.S. History courses.

Smithsonian Treasures of American History. New York: Collins, 2006.

Companion book to the Treasures of American History exhibition, featuring more than 150 objects from the NMAH collections.

“'Yours for Improvement'—The Adding Machines of Chicago, 1884–1930,” Annals of the History of Computing, 2001, 23: 3–21.
“The Material Culture of Scientific and Technical Information Systems in the United States—Patent Models to Computers,” Proceedings of the 2002 Conference on the History and Heritage of Scientific and Technical Information Systems, eds. Mary Ellen Bowden and W. Boyd Rayward, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2004.
Tools of American Mathematics Teaching, 1800-2000 with Amy Ackerberg-Hastings and David Lindsay Roberts, Baltimore:  The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

Surveys changes in the material culture of American mathematics teaching.  Tells stories about objects from the blackboard and the textbook to the protractor and the slide rule to the graphing calculator and computer software.

“Stalking the Elusive Computer Bug,” Annals of the History of Computing, 1998. 20: 5–9.
Essential Jazz Editions, Set #3: Music of the 30's, Part I (cellist). The Castle Trio. Smithsonian Collection of Recordings ND 034, 1988.

Essential Jazz Editions (EJE) is a series of scores for jazz ensembles transcribed from classic jazz recordings. Each original transcription includes historical and performance notes. This project was conceived jointly by Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, and the Music Division, Library of Congress.

Set #3 includes: From A_Flat to C, John Kirby Sextet; For Dancers Only, Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra; Big Jim Blues, Andy Kirk & His 12 Clouds of Joyl; Lonesome Road, Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra; and Symphony in Riffs, Benny Carter & His Orchestra.

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