Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Maritime Museum Policy and the Acquisition of Archaeological Materials," Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 16.1 (1992) 15–18.

A discussion of the ethics of collecting artifacts from ship wrecks.

Ship and Boat Models in Ancient Greece. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1985.

A study of some of the world’s earliest ship models.

The Maritime Administration Collection of Ship Plans (1939–1970) with Paula J. Johnson (eds.) Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1995.

A catalog of Smithsonian ship plans available to the public.

"Is it Treasure or a Worthless Piece of Ship?" Historical Archaeology 26.4 (1992) 119–123.

A discussion of the ethics of collecting artifacts from ship wrecks.

The New England Fisheries: A Treasure Greater than Gold. Salem: Peabody Museum, 1984. Received Award of Merit, American Association of Museums 1985 Museum Publications Competition.

An exhibition catalog and historical treatment of early and modern regional fisheries.

“The End of the Age of Sail: Merchant Shipping in the Nineteenth Century,” in George F. Bass (ed.), Ships and Shipwrecks of the Americas. London: Thames and Hudson, 1988. Chapter 12: pp. 231–50.

An historical and archaeological synthesis, with an emphasis on the knowledge gained from period shipwrecks.

"The Duty to Save Sunken Booty," Business and Society Review 73 (1990) 18–21.

The business of treasure hunting.

"Do They Really Pay You To Do That?" Increase & Diffusion: A Smithsonian Web Magazine 1 (September 1996).

A general-interest article on shipwreck archaeology and what is required behind the scenes.

Steam and the Sea. Salem: Peabody Museum, 1983.

An exhibition catalog and historical treatment of the origins and development of steamships from the 18th to the 20th centuries.

"The Philadelphia Steamboat of 1796," (ed.), Melvin H. Jackson. The American Neptune L.3 (1990) 201–210.

Article about Philadelphian Griffin Greene and a failed steamboat venture; the original materials are in the Smithsonian’s transportation collections.

Tinkering: Consumers Reinvent the Early Automobile . Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. Paper edition 2011.
Major Problems in American Popular Culture. New York: Cengage, 2012.
"Looking at Artifacts, Thinking about History." with Steven Lubar. Artifact & Analysis: A Teacher’s Guide to Interpreting Objects and Writing History. Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies and the National Museum of American History, 2001.

Discusses the value of artifacts in studying the past, and presents five ways to think about artifacts in history. Part of a teacher's guide developed for Advanced Placement Program U.S. History courses.

Legacies: Collecting America's History at the Smithsonian with Steven Lubar. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2001.

Explores changing ideas about what is worth saving from the American past through an illustrated history of the National Museum of American History's collections, featuring over 250 objects.

Smithsonian Treasures of American History. New York: Collins, 2006.

Companion book to the Treasures of American History exhibition, featuring more than 150 objects from the NMAH collections.

“Stalking the Elusive Computer Bug,” Annals of the History of Computing, 1998. 20: 5–9.
“'Yours for Improvement'—The Adding Machines of Chicago, 1884–1930,” Annals of the History of Computing, 2001, 23: 3–21.
“The Material Culture of Scientific and Technical Information Systems in the United States—Patent Models to Computers,” Proceedings of the 2002 Conference on the History and Heritage of Scientific and Technical Information Systems, eds. Mary Ellen Bowden and W. Boyd Rayward, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2004.
Tools of American Mathematics Teaching, 1800-2000 with Amy Ackerberg-Hastings and David Lindsay Roberts, Baltimore:  The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

Surveys changes in the material culture of American mathematics teaching.  Tells stories about objects from the blackboard and the textbook to the protractor and the slide rule to the graphing calculator and computer software.

Essential Jazz Editions, Set #3: Music of the 30's, Part I (cellist). The Castle Trio. Smithsonian Collection of Recordings ND 034, 1988.

Essential Jazz Editions (EJE) is a series of scores for jazz ensembles transcribed from classic jazz recordings. Each original transcription includes historical and performance notes. This project was conceived jointly by Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, and the Music Division, Library of Congress.

Set #3 includes: From A_Flat to C, John Kirby Sextet; For Dancers Only, Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra; Big Jim Blues, Andy Kirk & His 12 Clouds of Joyl; Lonesome Road, Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra; and Symphony in Riffs, Benny Carter & His Orchestra.

Essential Jazz Editions, Set #2: Louis Armstrong, 1926–1929

Essential Jazz Editions (EJE) is a series of scores for jazz ensembles transcribed from classic jazz recordings. Each original transcription includes historical and performance notes. This project was conceived jointly by Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, and the Music Division, Library of Congress.

Set #2 includes: Cornet Chop Suey, Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five; Hotter Than That, Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five; West End Blues, Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five; Tight Like This, Louis Armstrong and His Savoy Ballroom Five; and Mahogany Hall Stomp, Louis Armstrong and His Savoy Ballroom Five.

Essential Jazz Editions: Set #4: Music of the 1930s, Part II

Essential Jazz Editions (EJE) is a series of scores for jazz ensembles transcribed from classic jazz recordings. Each original transcription includes historical and performance notes. This project was conceived jointly by Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, and the Music Division, Library of Congress.

Set #4 includes: Avalon, Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra; Sweet Sue, Just You, Don Redman & His Orchestra; Swingtime in the Rockies, Benny Goodman & His Orchestra; King Porter Stomp, Benny Goodman & His Orchestra; and South Rampart Street Parade, Bob Crosby & His Orchestra.

Essential Jazz Editions: Set #1, New Orleans Jazz, 1918–1927

Essential Jazz Editions (EJE) is a series of scores for jazz ensembles transcribed from classic jazz recordings. Each original transcription includes historical and performance notes. This project was conceived jointly by Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, and the Music Division, Library of Congress.

Set #1 includes: Black Bottom Stomp, Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers; The Chant, Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers; Grandpa's Spells, Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers; Tiger Rag (Hold That Tiger), the Original Dixieland Jazz Band; and Potato Head Blues, Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven.

"Samuel Clagett Busey," "Charles R. Drew," "George Martin Kober," "George Lloyd Magruder," "Frederick May," "Thomas Miller," "Mary Almera Parsons," "Robert Reyburn," and "George Tully Vaughan." Dictionary of American Medical Biography, edited by Martin Kaufman, et al., 2 vols. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Biographical sketches of mainly early Washington, D.C. area physicians.

“Prototype Thermal Cycler for PCR, ‘Mr. Cycle’ (1985).” Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society, no. 63 (December, 1999): 22.

Short description of the prototype thermal cycler built in 1984–85 by the scientists and engineers at Cetus Corporation (Emeryville, Calif.), where Kary Mullis conceived the idea for PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), and Perkin-Elmer Corporation (Norwalk, Conn.). This instrument was collected for the NMAH collections and placed on display in the Science in American Life exhibition.

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