Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

Men and Women—A History of Costume, Gender, and Power Kathy Peiss. (Washington, D. C: NMAH, 1989).
"The Electric Guitar: How We Got From Andres Segovia to Kurt Cobain." American Heritage of Invention and Technology 20, no. 1 (summer 2004): 12–21.

The magazine's cover article about the invention and development of the electric guitar and how it changed the world of music during the 20th century. Features guitarists, makers, and innovators who played important roles in the evolution of the instrument and helped influence popular music styles including rock and roll.

"The Electric Guitar: How We Got From Andres Segovia to Kurt Cobain." In Regional Cultures in American Rock 'N' Roll: An Anthology, edited by David Stuart and Scott Anderson, 29-37. San Diego, CA: Cognella, a division of University Readers, Inc., 2011.

Reprinted from the American Heritage of Invention and Technology (summer 2004). Provides a brief history of the invention and early development of the electric guitar in America.

"Irons," "Stoves," and "Washing Machines." In Facts on File Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Society, edited by Rudi Volti. New York: Facts on File, 1999.

Entries in specialized science and technology encyclopedia about the invention and development of irons, stoves, and washing machines in America, with links to other inventions featured in the publication.

"From Frying Pan to Flying V: The Rise of the Electric Guitar" With Gary Sturm. Website 1997, redesigned 2004.

This virtual exhibition features instruments that illustrate how innovative makers and players combined the guitar with a pickup and amplifier to create a new instrument and a new sound that profoundly changed popular music—blues, country, rhythm and blues, jazz, and rock and roll—in the 20th-century. From an exhibition produced by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, November 1996 through October 1997.

Journal of Museum Education Co-published by the Museum Education Roundtable and Left Coast Press.

Monica Smith served as the Editor in Chief of  the Journal of Museum Education from 2005 to 2008.

"Invention at Play: An Award-winning Traveling Exhibition" In Museums at Play: Games, Interaction and Learning, edited by Katy Beale, 440-58. Edinburgh, Scotland: MuseumsEtc., 2011.

This chapter examines how the Lemelson Center's first major exhibition evolved into an exhibition focused on play, and the research, implementation, and evaluation processes along the way, to hopefully provide inspiration for future play-related museum initiatives.

"The Lemelson Center's Places of Invention Project" With Arthur P. Molella. Technology and Innovation 16, nos. 3-4 (2014): 175-185.

Provides an overview of the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the National Museum of American History and its Places of Invention exhibition project.

"Conservation." In The Jefferson Bible, Smithsonian Edition. Smithsonian Books, 2011.

Chapter describing the unique features and conservation treatment of “The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth Extracted Textually from the Gospels in Greek, Latin, French & English”, a book made by Thomas Jefferson for his own use, and now usually known as the Jefferson Bible.

"Books." In Conservation Resources for Art and Antiques. Washington Conservation Guild, 2001.

A guideline for collectors on art and antiquities conservation, and what to expect when seeking book conservation services.

"Aloft in a Balloon: Treatment of a Scrapbook of Early Aeronautica Collected by William Upcott, 1783-1840." AIC Book and Paper Group Annual 1997, v. 16, p. 9-13.

A description of the conservation treatment of a scrapbook of early aeronautica in the collection of the National Air and Space Museum’s rare book collection.

"The Shrink Wrap Project at Rutgers University Special Collections and Archives." AIC Book and Paper Group Annual 1993, v. 12, p. 56-60.

A description of the use of shrink wrap to protect 30,000 rare books during a collection storage renovation.

"The Shrink Wrap Project at Rutgers University Special Collections and Archives." The Abbey Newsletter 1994, v.18, no. 3.

A description of the use of shrink wrap to protect 30,000 rare books during a collection storage renovation.

"Caring for your Collections: Protecting your Books from Deterioration and Damage." Orator, Smithsonian Institution, National African American Museum Project, Volume 1, No. 1, February 1993.

Guidelines for the general public on preservation recommendations for books.

"Clockwork History: Monumental Clocks and the Depiction of the American Past, 1875–1900" with O'Malley, Michael. Bulletin of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors 32 (February 1990): 3–15.

Describes the 19th-century phenomenon of very large clocks depicting scenes from American history, with special emphasis on one in NMAH’s collections.

“Engineering Time: Inventing the Electronic Watch” with Maggie Dennis. British Journal for the History of Science (2000): 477–497. The article has also been published in translation in the Journal of the Horological Institute of Japan, thanks to the efforts of Kouji Kubota at the Seiko Institute of Horology.

History of the earliest quartz watches made in Switzerland, Japan and the United States. The full text of this article has been posted on the Web site of the IEEE’s UFFC Society.

"The Impact of the Telegraph on Public Time in the United States, 1844–1893.” IEEE Technology and Society Magazine 8 (March 1989): 4–10.

Describes the use of the telegraph and development of special technologies for sending time signals for commercial, industrial and community purposes.

“From Little Machines to Big Themes: Clocks, Watches and Time at the National Museum of American History.” Material History Review (Fall 2000): 44–58.

Essay on the history of collecting and exhibiting timepieces at the Smithsonian Institution.

"Partners in Time: William Bond & Son of Boston and the Harvard College Observatory." Harvard Library Bulletin 35 (Fall 1987): 351–384.

Outlines the interlocking interests of a Boston watch and clock firm with the Harvard College Observatory in the mid-19th century.

"The Most Reliable Time': William Bond, the New England Railroads, and Time Awareness in 19th-Century America." Technology & Culture 30 (January 1989): 1–24.

Describes the growth of a time service and a standard time for New England in the mid-19th century in response to the needs of regional railroads and the availability of reliable time from the Harvard College Observatory.

"A Place for Public Business: The Material Culture of the Nineteenth-Century Federal Office” with Steven Lubar. Business and Economic History, Second Series, 15 (1986): 159–173.

Describes office furnishings and machines developed in response to the growing needs of an expanding federal bureaucracy.

"Schreib- und Rechenmaschinenschätze der Smithsonian Institution." Translation by Hartmut Keil. Historische Bürowelt 10 (July 1985): 7–10.

Survey of historically significant typewriters and calculators in Smithsonian collections for a German audience.

"Before Standard Time: Distributing Time in 19th-Century America." Vistas in Astronomy 28 (July 1985): 113–118.

Brief survey of time signals distributed by telegraph, with special emphasis on the Harvard College Observatory.

Inventing Standard Time. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American History, 1983.

Booklet that accompanied a temporary NMAH exhibition of the same name.

“Evidence of Technology’s Past: The Collections of the National Museum of American History” with John Fleckner. In Clio in Museum Garb: The National Museum of American History, the Science Museum and the History of Technology. London: Science Museum Papers in the History of Technology, 1997.

Essay on the relationship of object and archival collections at the Smithsonian Institution, with special emphasis on recent collecting.

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