The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

Chamber music of Louis Spohr: Sextet, Op. 140; Octet, Op. 65 (cellist). Smithsonian Chamber Players and L’Archibudelli. SONY Vivarte SK 53307, 1993.

CD recording of two important works by the German Romantic violinist and composer Louis Spohr, played on eight Stradivarius instruments, including the Ole Bull and Greffuhle violins, the Axelrod viola, and the Servais and Marylebone cellos from the Smithsonian collection. Slowik’s accompanying essay discusses the works, including reflections on Brahm's debt to Spohr’s Sextet.

Visions of Freedom on the Great Plains: An Illustrated History of African Americans in Nebraska with Bertha Calloway. Donning Publishers, 1998.
Museum Review, the Yorktown Victory Center, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 54, No. 2. (Apr. 1997), pp. 440–442.
Response to Nathan Huggins, "The Deforming Mirror of Truth: Slavery and the Master Narrative of American History," Radical History Review 49 (Winter 1991), pp. 56–59.
Review of “We the People: Creating a New Nation, 1765-1820,” Chicago Historical Society exhibition, The Journal of American History, Vol. 76, No. 1. (Jun. 1989), pp. 198–202.
Review of The Great River, Art and Society of the Connecticut River Valley, 1635–1820, by Gerald W. R. Ward; William N. Hosley, Jr., The New England Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 4. (Dec. 1986), 588–594.
"Food Rioters and the American Revolution," William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser., Vol. 51, No. 1. (Jan. 1994), pp. 3–38.
Review of Cary Carson, et al. Becoming Americans: Our Struggle to Be Both, in William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser. Vol. 56, No. 4. (Oct. 1999), pp. 842–847.
"From Another Site: Comments on 'Digitizing Women's History'," Radical History Review 68 (1997), pp. 121–25.
"Social Visions of the American Revolution, 1765–1775," in The Transforming Hand of Revolution: Reconsidering the Revolution as a Social Movement, ed. Ronald Hoffman and Peter J. Albert (Charlottesville, Va.: University of Virginia Press, 1995), pp. 27–57.
“A Case Study of Applied Feminist Theories,” in Gender Perspectives: Essays on Women in Museums, ed. Jane R. Glazer and Artemis A. Zenetou (Washington, D.C: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994), 137–146.
“The Adequate Revolution,” Roundtable on Gordon Wood, The Radicalism of the American Revolution, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 51, No. 4. (Oct. 1994), 684–692.
Men and Women—A History of Costume, Gender, and Power Kathy Peiss. (Washington, D. C: NMAH, 1989).
Excerpts from a Conference to Honor William Appleman Williams with Dina Copelman, ed. Radical History Review 50 (1991), pp. 39–70.
"Markets, Streets, and Stores: Contested Terrain in Pre-industrial Boston," in Autre Temps, Autre Espace/An Other Time An Other Space, ed. Elise Marienstras and Barbara Karsky (Nancy, France: Presses universitaires de Nancy, 1986), pp. 172–97.
"Revolution in Boston," for the National Park Service handbook, Boston and the American Revolution, Boston National Historic Park and Freedom Trail (July 1998), pp. 6–73.
"The Authority of History: The Changing Public Face of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania," Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography CXIV (1990), pp. 37–66.
“Revolutionary Consent,” The Boston Review, 29 (Feb/Mar 2004), pp. 20–25.
After the Revolution: The Smithsonian History of Everyday Life in the Eighteenth Century (New York: Pantheon Press, 1985).
"Invention at Play: An Award-winning Traveling Exhibition" In Museums at Play: Games, Interaction and Learning, edited by Katy Beale, 440-58. Edinburgh, Scotland: MuseumsEtc., 2011.

This chapter examines how the Lemelson Center's first major exhibition evolved into an exhibition focused on play, and the research, implementation, and evaluation processes along the way, to hopefully provide inspiration for future play-related museum initiatives.

"From Frying Pan to Flying V: The Rise of the Electric Guitar" With Gary Sturm. Original website 1997; redesigned 2014.

This virtual exhibition features instruments that illustrate how innovative makers and players combined the guitar with a pickup and amplifier to create a new instrument and a new sound that profoundly changed popular music—blues, country, rhythm and blues, jazz, and rock and roll—in the 20th-century. From an exhibition produced by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, November 1996 through October 1997.

"The Electric Guitar: How We Got From Andres Segovia to Kurt Cobain." In Regional Cultures in American Rock 'N' Roll: An Anthology, edited by David Stuart and Scott Anderson, 29-37. San Diego, CA: Cognella, a division of University Readers, Inc., 2011.

Provides a brief history of the invention and early development of the electric guitar in America. Reprinted from the American Heritage of Invention and Technology 20, no. 1 (summer 2004). 

"The Electric Guitar: How We Got From Andres Segovia to Kurt Cobain." American Heritage of Invention and Technology 20, no. 1 (summer 2004): 12–21.

The magazine's cover article about the invention and development of the electric guitar and how it changed the world of music during the 20th century. Features guitarists, makers, and innovators who played important roles in the evolution of the instrument and helped influence popular music styles including rock and roll. Reprinted iRegional Cultures in American Rock 'N' Roll: An Anthology, edited by David Stuart and Scott Anderson (2011).

"Why There? Why Then? Examining Places of Invention." Dimensions 18, no. 3 (May-June 2016): 30-35.

This article in the bimonthly journal of the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) provides an overview of the  Places of Invention (POI) project, including the exhibition and public programs at NMAH and with Smithsonian Affiliate project partners, as well as POI-related questions that could be adapted by other museums for public programs and oral history projects.

"Playful Invention, Inventive Play." International Journal of Play 5, no. 3 (July 2016): 244-261.

This peer-reviewed article shares the Lemelson Center's primary and secondary research behind the award-winning Invention at Play exhibition regarding connections among play, child development, creativity, and invention.