Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Irons," "Stoves," and "Washing Machines." In Facts on File Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Society, edited by Rudi Volti. New York: Facts on File, 1999.

Entries in specialized science and technology encyclopedia about the invention and development of irons, stoves, and washing machines in America, with links to other inventions featured in the publication.

"Why There? Why Then? Examining Places of Invention." Dimensions 18, no. 3 (May-June 2016): 30-35.

This article in the bimonthly journal of the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) provides an overview of the  Places of Invention (POI) project, including the exhibition and public programs at NMAH and with Smithsonian Affiliate project partners, as well as POI-related questions that could be adapted by other museums for public programs and oral history projects.

"Playful Invention, Inventive Play." International Journal of Play 5, no. 3 (July 2016): 244-261.

This peer-reviewed article shares the Lemelson Center's primary and secondary research behind the award-winning Invention at Play exhibition regarding connections among play, child development, creativity, and invention.

“Medical Alley, Minnesota (1950s): Tight-Knit Community of Tinkerers Keeps Hearts Ticking.” In Places of Invention, edited by Arthur P. Molella and Anna Karvellas, 86-109, Washington, DC Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2015.

Places of Invention tells the stories of people who lived, worked, played, collaborated, adapted, took risks, solved problems, and sometimes failed--all in the pursuit of something new. It dispels the myth of the lone inventor and shows that invention and innovation abound--not just in the Silicon Valleys of America but in hometowns across the country.

"The Lemelson Center's Places of Invention Project" With Arthur P. Molella. Technology and Innovation 16, nos. 3-4 (2014): 175-185.

This peer-reviewed article provides an overview of the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the National Museum of American History and its Places of Invention exhibition project. Reprinted in two parts in Inventors Digest  31, nos. 2-3 (February and March 2015).

"Places of Invention Project." With Arthur P. Molella. Inventors Digest 31, nos. 2-3 (February and March 2015).

Provides an overview of the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the National Museum of American History and its Places of Invention exhibition project. Reprinted from Technology and Innovation 16, nos. 3-4 (2014): 175-185.

"Conservation." In The Jefferson Bible, Smithsonian Edition. Smithsonian Books, 2011.

Chapter describing the unique features and conservation treatment of “The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth Extracted Textually from the Gospels in Greek, Latin, French & English”, a book made by Thomas Jefferson for his own use, and now usually known as the Jefferson Bible.

"Books." In Conservation Resources for Art and Antiques. Washington Conservation Guild, 2001.

A guideline for collectors on art and antiquities conservation, and what to expect when seeking book conservation services.

"Aloft in a Balloon: Treatment of a Scrapbook of Early Aeronautica Collected by William Upcott, 1783-1840." AIC Book and Paper Group Annual 1997, v. 16, p. 9-13.

A description of the conservation treatment of a scrapbook of early aeronautica in the collection of the National Air and Space Museum’s rare book collection.

"The Shrink Wrap Project at Rutgers University Special Collections and Archives." AIC Book and Paper Group Annual 1993, v. 12, p. 56-60.

A description of the use of shrink wrap to protect 30,000 rare books during a collection storage renovation.

"The Shrink Wrap Project at Rutgers University Special Collections and Archives." The Abbey Newsletter 1994, v.18, no. 3.

A description of the use of shrink wrap to protect 30,000 rare books during a collection storage renovation.

"Caring for your Collections: Protecting your Books from Deterioration and Damage." Orator, Smithsonian Institution, National African American Museum Project, Volume 1, No. 1, February 1993.

Guidelines for the general public on preservation recommendations for books.

"“Time in Place: Cold War Clocks and the American West,” .  in Volker Janssen, ed., <em>Where Minds and Matters Meet:  Technology in California and the West</em>.  Pasadena, Calif.: University of California Press, 2012.
“Time in Place: Cold War Clocks and the American West,” in Volker Janssen, ed., Where Minds and Matters Meet:  Technology in California and the West .  Pasadena, Calif.: University of California Press, 2012.           
“Revolution on Your Wrist,” with Maggie Dennis and Amanda Dillon. Increase and Diffusion Web site. 1997.

Web site article exploring the shift from pocket watches to wristwatches in the early 20th century, and the subsequent shift to electronic timekeeping in the 1970s.

“Naturwissenschaftliche Bilding ist Kein Luxus: Die Austellung ‘Science in American Life’ in Washington.” with Arthur Molella. Translation by Andrea Lucas. Kultur & Technik 4 (1995): 51ff.

Key themes and objects in NMAH exhibition Science in American Life for a German audience.

"Videohistory at Waltham Clock Company, Waltham, Massachusetts: An Evaluation." In Terri Schorzman, ed., The Smithsonian Videohistory Project: A Handbook, 1993.

Essay on the experience and utility of recording operating machinery and employee interviews for documenting technical, nonverbal thinking.

American Clocks with Otto Mayr. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American History, 1990.

Highlights booklet containing photos and descriptions of twenty of the most interesting clocks in the collections of the Smithsonian.

"Astronomy as Public Utility: the Bond Years at the Harvard College Observatory." Journal of the History of Astronomy 21(1990): 21-36. Reprinted in Owen Gingerich and Michael Hoskins, Two Astronomical Anniversaries: HCO & SAO (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 1990), pp. 21–36.

Article about the period between 1839 and 1865, when the observatory provided the U.S. federal government with observations for determining basic latitudes and longitudes and offered the local community a time service.

“Engineering Time: Inventing the Electronic Watch” with Maggie Dennis. British Journal for the History of Science (2000): 477–497. The article has also been published in translation in the Journal of the Horological Institute of Japan, thanks to the efforts of Kouji Kubota at the Seiko Institute of Horology.

History of the earliest quartz watches made in Switzerland, Japan and the United States. The full text of this article has been posted on the Web site of the IEEE’s UFFC Society.

"The U.S. Topographical Engineers and Their Scientific Instruments: A Research Opportunity." Rittenhouse 4 (February 1990): 61–63.

Research note describing records at the U.S. National Archives rich in information about the use of instruments during the mid 19th-century.

“From Little Machines to Big Themes: Clocks, Watches and Time at the National Museum of American History.” Material History Review (Fall 2000): 44–58.

Essay on the history of collecting and exhibiting timepieces at the Smithsonian Institution.

"Clockwork History: Monumental Clocks and the Depiction of the American Past, 1875–1900" with O'Malley, Michael. Bulletin of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors 32 (February 1990): 3–15.

Describes the 19th-century phenomenon of very large clocks depicting scenes from American history, with special emphasis on one in NMAH’s collections.

"The Impact of the Telegraph on Public Time in the United States, 1844–1893.” IEEE Technology and Society Magazine 8 (March 1989): 4–10.

Describes the use of the telegraph and development of special technologies for sending time signals for commercial, industrial and community purposes.

"Partners in Time: William Bond & Son of Boston and the Harvard College Observatory." Harvard Library Bulletin 35 (Fall 1987): 351–384.

Outlines the interlocking interests of a Boston watch and clock firm with the Harvard College Observatory in the mid-19th century.

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