Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Baltimore Quilts in Bath, England," America in Britain, Fall 2002.

Explicates the design of several quilts in the American Museum in Bath, England.

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Warriors: A Photographic History by Gertrude Käsebier New York: Smithsonian Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2007.
“Collecting Pictorialism at the Smithsonian 1896-1959,” The History of Photography Journal, National Museum of American History edition, Spring 2000.

A history of collecting and exhibiting art photography at the Smithsonian. Illustrations highlight objects and past exhibitions from the NMAH collections.

“The 1896 Washington Salon and Art Photography,” American Art Review, January–February 1997.

Summary of the exhibition of the first photographic salon in the United States, and the beginnings of the national collection of photography at the Smithsonian. Illustrations of images shown at the 1896 salon now in the NMAH collections.

“The Quartz Watch,” with Carlene Stephens. Lemelson Center for Study of Invention and Innovation Web site. 1997.

Web site exploring the global competition to develop the first quartz electronic wristwatches in the late 1960s and 1970s.

“Time’s New Face: Liquid Crystals in Your Wristwatch,” with Carlene Stephens. Invention and Technology, Spring 2002, p. 27.

Sidebar article on the application of liquid crystal display technology in digital watches in the 1970s.

“Revolution on Your Wrist” with Carlene Stephens and Amanda Dillon. Increase and Diffusion Web site. 1997.

Web site article exploring the shift from pocket watches to wristwatches in the early 20th century, and the subsequent shift to electronic timekeeping in the 1970s.

“We Are Living in a Digital World, but Not Always,” Newsday, Section B, September 30, 2001, p. B8.

Popular interest news feature on the public reaction to digital watches when they were first introduced in the 1970s.

“Engineering Time: Inventing the Electronic Wristwatch,” British Journal for the History of Science, No. 4, Vol. 33, Dec. 2000, pp. 477–497.

Survey of three independent teams in the United States, Switzerland and Japan that invented the first electronic quartz wristwatches.

"Access Denied: Asbestos Contamination as Catalyst and Hindrance to Collection Retrieval and Preservation" Journal of the American Institute for Conservation, Spring 2000 Vol.39 Number 1 pp. 75–84.
“Airplanes, Balloons, and Cartridge Bags: A Few Fabrics of WWI,” the proceedings of the Textile History Forum, Cooperstown, New York, 2003.
“The Cow the Milkmaid and the Chemist”, the proceedings of the Ars Textrina conference, University of Leeds, Leeds, England, 2000.
“Documenting the Spirit of Innovation: The Nobel Voices Video History Project.” Kultur und Technik 4 (October 2001).

An analysis of the Lemelson Center's Nobel laureate video history documentation project (2000-2003) which explores laureates' youthful inspirations, views on creativity and innovation, and social visions.

"Working at Menlo Park." in William S. Pretzer (ed.), Working at Inventing: Thomas A. Edison and the Menlo Park Experience. Dearborn, MI: Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village, 1989 (reprint 2002), pp. 32–47.

Edison was supported in his work at Menlo Park by a number of assistants. This is an analysis of their backgrounds and their reasons for coming and leaving.

"The Search for a Vacuum," "Carbon and the Incandescent Lamp," "Who Invented the Incandescent Lamp?," "The Menlo Park Mystique." in Robert Friedel, Paul Israel, Bernard Finn, Edison's Electric Light: Biography of an Invention. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1985.

These are short, pointed essays in a book that provides a definitive account of Edison's invention.

"The Museum of Science and Technology." in Michael S. Shapiro (ed.), The Museum: A Reference Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1989, pp. 59–83.

A discussion of the history of these museums, followed by a bibliography (partially annotated).

“Collectors and Museums,” in Artefacts, Vol 2, Exposing Electronics. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 2000, pp. 175–191.

Comments on ways that private collections have affected the development of public institutions.

“Context and Controversy.” in Svante Lindqvist (ed.), Museums of Modern Science; Nobel Symposium 112. Canton, MA: Science History Publications, 2000, pp. 151–158.

A discussion of how and why exhibitions at technical museums have increasingly had the potential to be controversial.

"Alexander Graham Bell's Experiments with the Variable-Resistance Transmitter." Smithsonian Journal of History 1, no. 4 (1966), pp. 1–16.

Experiments with Bell's instruments (and reproductions of them), combined with remarks made in his notebooks, provide fresh insights into the origins of his invention.

"An Appraisal of the Origins of Franklin's Electrical Theory." Isis 60 (1969), pp. 362–369.

Word analysis is used to speculate on where Franklin got some of his ideas.

Artefacts, Vol. 4, Presenting Pictures. Principal editor. London: Science Museum, 2004.

There are essays on the history of technologies for reproducing and transmitting images and also one on museums of printing and photography.

"Edison and the Style of Invention." Rassagna: Problemi di architettura dell'ambiente, 13, 46/2 (1991), 44-53.

This is an attempt to analyze Edison's work as a matter of "style."

"Franklin as Electrician." IEEE Proceedings 64 (1976), 1270–1273.

In many ways Franklin benefitted from his isolation in America and was free to develop new concepts.

"Growing Pains at the Crossroads of the World: A Submarine Cable Station in the 1870s." IEEE Proceedings 64 (1976), pp. 1287–1292.

How the introducton of new technologies and hardships in a remote Newfoundland station interacted.

"History of Thermoelectricity." in Advances in Electronics and Electronic Physics, 50 (1980), 175–240.

A detailed discussion of experimental and theoretical work, based on Ph.D. dissertation.

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