Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

Artefacts, Vol. 4, Presenting Pictures. Principal editor. London: Science Museum, 2004.

There are essays on the history of technologies for reproducing and transmitting images and also one on museums of printing and photography.

"Franklin as Electrician." IEEE Proceedings 64 (1976), 1270–1273.

In many ways Franklin benefitted from his isolation in America and was free to develop new concepts.

"Growing Pains at the Crossroads of the World: A Submarine Cable Station in the 1870s." IEEE Proceedings 64 (1976), pp. 1287–1292.

How the introducton of new technologies and hardships in a remote Newfoundland station interacted.

"History of Thermoelectricity." in Advances in Electronics and Electronic Physics, 50 (1980), 175–240.

A detailed discussion of experimental and theoretical work, based on Ph.D. dissertation.

"Output of Eighteenth-Century Electrostatic Machines." British Journal for the History of Science 5 (1971), pp. 289–291.

By measuremnt and analysis of published accounts it is possible to determine the voltage levels of these machines and (by measuremnets on Leyden jars) their energy output.

"Telegraph Practice in the 19th Century." Actes du XIIIe Congrès International d'Histoire des Sciences (1975).

A look at how practice was determined (or not determined) by the design of the instruments.

A Retrospective Technology Assessment: Submarine Telegraphy. with Vary Coates, et al. San Francisco: San Francisco Press, 1979.

A history of submarine telegraphy with emphasis on the period from the 1850s to the 1950s, including speculation about what people in the 1860s might reasonably have projected the impact of the cables to be.

"The Incandescent Electric Light." in Margaret Latimer and Brooke Hindle (eds.), Bridge to the Future, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 424 (1984), pp. 247–263.

This is an anlaysis of the symbolic use of the incandescent lamp in religious writings, cartoons, art (including Picasso's Guernica).

The History of Electrical Technology: An Annotated Bibliography. New York: Garland Press, 1991.

There are over 1500 entries in this international survey, with author and subject indexes.

"Working at Menlo Park." in William S. Pretzer (ed.), Working at Inventing: Thomas A. Edison and the Menlo Park Experience. Dearborn, MI: Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village, 1989 (reprint 2002), pp. 32–47.

Edison was supported in his work at Menlo Park by a number of assistants. This is an analysis of their backgrounds and their reasons for coming and leaving.

"The Search for a Vacuum," "Carbon and the Incandescent Lamp," "Who Invented the Incandescent Lamp?," "The Menlo Park Mystique." in Robert Friedel, Paul Israel, Bernard Finn, Edison's Electric Light: Biography of an Invention. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1985.

These are short, pointed essays in a book that provides a definitive account of Edison's invention.

Artefacts, Vol 2, Exposing Electronics Principal editor. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 2000.

There are several essays on the history of electronics, with an emphasis on the importance of loking at objects. There is also a section on museums with electrical collections.

"Reaching the Mass Audience: Business History as Popular History," in James O'Toole, ed., The Records of American Business (Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 1997)

Discusses the role of archival records, especially audio-visual materials, in such popular business history forms as exhibitions, licensed product reproductions, and print publications.

"The Last Revolution and the Next," Journal of Archival Organization, 2 (number 1/2), 2004.

Information and communications technologies have transformed the archival enterprise, changing the way we work and our relationship with the wider society. Access to archives has increased immeasurably and spurred demand for use of archives. At the same time, in a painful irony, public support for archival work is under attack. Archivists must continue to assert the case for archives in our larger civic life.

"Summary Remarks." Choices and Challenges: Collecting by Museums and Archives. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village, 2002.

Comments on eight papers that examine issues in the acquisition of artifacts and archival materials by museums and archives. Urges attention to the social and civic role of our institutions and their holdings.

"Greeting Cards and American Consumer Culture," in The Gift as Material Culture (Yale-Smithsonian Reports on Material Culture, No. 4, 1995)

Greeting cards are associated with gift exchange and sentimentality while simultaneously belonging to a vast consumer industry.

"The Archives Center at the National Museum of American History: Connecting Archival Materials and Artifacts," Collections, 3 (number 2, Spring, 2007)
"How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Artifact," Museum Archives Section Newsletter, Summer, 2005 
"Recent science: late-modern and post-modern." In The Historiography of Contemporary Science and Technology. Thomas Söderqvist, editor. (Harwood Academic Publications: London and Chur, 1997), pp. 179–213. Reprinted, with a few revisions, in Science Bought and Sold: Rethinking the Economics of Science. Philip Mirowski and E.-M. Sent, editors. (University of Chicago Press, 2002), pp. 109–148.

Essays identifying the features that distinguish knowledge production in postmodernity from the modern era, stressing the overproduction of all cultural goods, and the acceptance of bound and interested knowledge as fully legitimate knowledge. Direction of knowledge production by moral considerations is thus likewise legitimated, with ‘responsibility’ then appearing to gain primacy as normative category.

Einstein: a Centenary Exhibition with Paul A. Hanle. (Smithsonian Institution Press for National Museum of History and Technology, 1979), 48 pp.

Catalog of an special exhibition, 1979–80, in the Dibner Exhibition Gallery of the Museum featuring artists portraits of Einstein, manuscripts by him, and apparatus connected with tests of his special and general theories of relativity – notably a large torsion balance to test equivalence of gravitational and inertial mass constructed for Lorand Eötvös (lent by Museum for History and Science and Technology, Budapest), and a 1300 Kg aluminum cylinder deployed by Joseph Weber as gravitational wave antenna.

"Researching Rabi's Relics: Using the Electron to Determine Nuclear Moments before Magnetic Resonance, 1927–1937." Artefacts: Studies in the History of Science and Technology. vol.2: Exposing Electronics. Bernard Finn, editor. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 2000. pp. 161–174.

An overview of the technique of magnetic deflection of molecular beams employed by Columbia University physicist I. I. Rabi to determine spins and magnetic moments of atomic nuclei in the years before he invented the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance.

"Schrödinger, Erwin." in The Oxford Companion to the History of Science. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. pp.733–34.

Brief biography of this early 20th -entury Austrian theoretical physicist with appraisals of his work, in particular disparaging his highly influential What Is Life? as of little value.

"Alfred Landé and the Anomalous Zeeman Effect, 1919–1921," Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences, 2: 153–261 (1970).

An account of the early career of German theoretical physicist Alfred Landé, with a close examination of the process by which he came to provide a quantum-theoretical, phenomenological accounting for the anomalous (classically inexplicable) effect upon the light emitted by atoms placed in magnetic fields – together with some reflections upon the inherent impossibility of retracing the conceptual steps to a discovery.

"Scientific Internationalism and the Weimar Physicists: The Ideology and its Manipulation in Germany after World War I," Isis, 64: 151–180 (1973).

Explores internationalism as an element of the ideology of scientists, and the ways in which German physicists and other scholars reconciled that ideology with nationalistic attitudes and behaviors in the decade following World War I.

"Atom Smashers: Fifty Years': Preview of an Exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators," IEEE Trans. on Nuclear Science, NS-24: 1896–99 (1977).

Describes concept and content of a large exhibition on the history of particle accelerators and detectors, then in preparation, and on display until 1988.

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