Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Folk Is A Four-Letter Word: Dealing With Traditional **** in Fieldwork, Analysis and Presentation" in Richard M. Dorson, ed. The Handbook of American Folklore. Bloomington, In.: Indiana University Press, 1981.

An article which attempts to set some guidelines for scholarly fieldwork, analysis and presentation of bawdy or obscene materials.

"Rosebuds of the Plateau: Frank Matsura and the Fainting Couch Aesthetic," in Lucy Lippard, ed. Partial Recall: Photographs of Native North Americans. New York: New Press, 1992; reprinted in Dark Night, 2000.

A piece of creative nonfiction that comments on historical photography of Indians and reimagines the history of the two Northwest Coast women in a turn-of-the-century photograph by Frank Matsura, a Japanese photographer in Washington State.

"The Tribe Called Wannabee: Playing Indian in Europe and America" (1988); reprinted in W. Fleming and J, Watts, eds. Visions of A People: Introduction to Native American Studies, 1994.

A much-cited and reprinted essay, used in Native studies curricula on the centrality of representations of Native Americans in American popular culture to American identity, particularly the phenomenon of "playing Indian."

"Towards A Code of Ethics in the Conduct of Culturally-Based Scientific Research" in JV Martinez and Diana Marinez, eds. Aspects of Indian and Hispanic Involvement in Biomedical Research: Proceedings of the Society for the Advancement of Chicano and Native American Scientists, 1981. Bethesda, Md: National Institutes of Health, 1980.

An article that lays the groundwork for the development of a code of ethics in culturally-based scientific research.

Women in American Indian Society, Chelsea House Publishers, New York, 1991.

Used as a textbook in many colleges; an introduction to the histories and cultures of Native women in North America. Illustrated with art, photography and material culture.

"Grass Don't Grow On a Racetrack and Other Paradigms for Folklore and Feminism." Introduction to Jane Young et al, eds. Folklife and Feminist Theory, University of Illinois Press, 1993 (appeared, January, 1994).

An attempt to characterize the central themes and issues of feminist theory produced by folklore scholars.

Indian SIA: The Social Impact Assessment of Rapid Resource Development on Native Peoples, with Charles Geisler, Patrick West, eds. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan School of Natural Resources Report Series, 1980.
That's What She Said: Contemporary Fiction and Poetry By Native American Women, ed. Bloomington, Indiana, 1984.

A brief literary history of the creative work of American Indian women with sections from 12 representative
contemporary writers.

"A Modest Proposal: The Museum of the Plains White Person," in Senator Robert Torricelli, Andrew Carroll, and Andrew Dubill, eds. In Our Own Words: Greatest Speeches of The American Century. Kodansha America, Inc., 1999.

A satirical reversal of the usual representation of Native Americans in museums.

"Mythologizing Pocahontas." In Carol E. Robertson. Musical Repercussions of 1492: Encounters in Text and Performance. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992.

An examination of the representations and images—in American music—of Native American women.

"Culturally-Based Science: The Value to Traditional People, Science and Folklore," in Venetia Newall, ed. Folklore in the Twentieth Century, London: Rowman and Littlefield: 204–212, 1981.

An essay which suggests the value, to scholars and traditional cultures, of folklorists’ and social scientists’ attentions to the scientific traditions of the cultures they study—particularly in areas such as medicine, botany, pharmaceutics, agriculture.

Native American Women: A Contextual Bibliography. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1984.

Comprehensive bibliography on Native North American women, with historical commentary.

"Red Earth People and Southeastern Basketry," in Linda Mowat, ed. Basketmakers: Meaning and Form in Native American Baskets. Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum, 1992.

A look at the history and contemporary manifestations of basketry from Native Southeastern people.

"Indian Stereotypes." Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife Handbook (October): 18–21, 1980.
"The Mickey Mouse Kachina." American Art 1, no. 1 (1992).

An examination of an object from the collections of the National Museum of American Art, which suggests the possibilities for culture change and for humor and resistance in cntemporary Native/Hopi material culture.

"Traditional Cultures in a Technology-Based World." Darshana: Sinhalese Journal of Culture. (Spring): 19–23. (in Sinhalese).

A proposal for constructing technological change using a culture-based approach.

"More Than Meets the Eye: Gertrude Kasebier’s ‘Indian’ Photographs," with Helena Wright, guest editor. The History of Photography Journal (Winter 2000).

Examines the “Indian” photographs by Gertrude Kasebier, in NMAH collections, and compares her work to the clichés of 19th century Native photography.

"Magnolias Grown in Dirt," Southern Exposure, 1977; reprinted in J. Zandy. Calling Home: Working-Class Women's Writings. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

A much-cited essay on bawdy oral traditions among Southern women, with special reference to particular traditions in my own family.

The British Museum Encyclopedia of Native North America, with Melanie Fernandez. London, Bloomington, IN, Toronto, Canada: British Museum Press, 1999.

Up-to-date histories and cultures of first peoples (North America) from a native perspective; highly illustrated, with stories, poems, eye-witness, first person accounts from native peoples on events, issues, art, mythologies, gender roles, economics, contact, sovereignty, self-determination, land, environment. Uses artifacts from the collections at the British Museum and Smithsonian.

"The Scurlock Studio: A Biography," (with Donna M. Wells), Picturing the Promise: The Scurlock Studio and Black Washington.  Washington, D.C.: National Museum of African American History and Culture in collaboration with the National Museum of American history, 2009, pp. 196-212.

A history of the Scurlock family studio and its significance for the African American community of Washington.

“The Archives Center and Photography: National Museum of American History,” History of Photography, Spring 2000 (Vol. 24, No. 1), p. 49.

A description of the Archives Center's photographic collections, policies, and programs, with emphasis on major recent acquisitions, such as the Scurlock Studio Records.

“The Scurlock Ninety-Year Project: Black Washington in Black America,” Exposure, vol. 32:1 (1999), pp. 64–73.

A summary of the history of the Scurlock Studio and a description of the the Museum's Scurlock collection, with remarks about conservation challenges, especially regarding deteriorating acetate negatives.

“Wayward Wife as Muse: Anais Nin and Ian Hugo,” in Anais Nin: A Book of Mirrors, ed. by Paul Herron. Huntington Woods, Mich.: Sky Blue Press, 1996, pp. 44–57.

A critical appraisal of the influence of diarist and surrealist Anais Nin on the films of her husband Ian Hugo. Nin served as muse, model, actress, and collaborator in inspiring Hugo to become a creative artist.

“Souvenirs of Roads Not Taken: Virtual Travel with the Underwood & Underwood Travel System and the World Wide Web,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 131–139.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism details the ways in which commercially published stereographs were used to simulate travel experiences, 1895-1921.

“Labyrinthine Walk: A Guide for Politically Incorrect Tourists,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 141–157.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism analyzes the goals of tourists when visiting museums as part of a sight-seeing ritual.

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