The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Towards A Code of Ethics in the Conduct of Culturally-Based Scientific Research" in JV Martinez and Diana Marinez, eds. Aspects of Indian and Hispanic Involvement in Biomedical Research: Proceedings of the Society for the Advancement of Chicano and Native American Scientists, 1981. Bethesda, Md: National Institutes of Health, 1980.

An article that lays the groundwork for the development of a code of ethics in culturally-based scientific research.

Women in American Indian Society, Chelsea House Publishers, New York, 1991.

Used as a textbook in many colleges; an introduction to the histories and cultures of Native women in North America. Illustrated with art, photography and material culture.

"The Tribe Called Wannabee: Playing Indian in Europe and America" (1988); reprinted in W. Fleming and J, Watts, eds. Visions of A People: Introduction to Native American Studies, 1994.

A much-cited and reprinted essay, used in Native studies curricula on the centrality of representations of Native Americans in American popular culture to American identity, particularly the phenomenon of "playing Indian."

Indian SIA: The Social Impact Assessment of Rapid Resource Development on Native Peoples, with Charles Geisler, Patrick West, eds. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan School of Natural Resources Report Series, 1980.
That's What She Said: Contemporary Fiction and Poetry By Native American Women, ed. Bloomington, Indiana, 1984.

A brief literary history of the creative work of American Indian women with sections from 12 representative
contemporary writers.

"Grass Don't Grow On a Racetrack and Other Paradigms for Folklore and Feminism." Introduction to Jane Young et al, eds. Folklife and Feminist Theory, University of Illinois Press, 1993 (appeared, January, 1994).

An attempt to characterize the central themes and issues of feminist theory produced by folklore scholars.

"Culturally-Based Science: The Value to Traditional People, Science and Folklore," in Venetia Newall, ed. Folklore in the Twentieth Century, London: Rowman and Littlefield: 204–212, 1981.

An essay which suggests the value, to scholars and traditional cultures, of folklorists’ and social scientists’ attentions to the scientific traditions of the cultures they study—particularly in areas such as medicine, botany, pharmaceutics, agriculture.

The British Museum Encyclopedia of Native North America, with Melanie Fernandez. London, Bloomington, IN, Toronto, Canada: British Museum Press, 1999.

Up-to-date histories and cultures of first peoples (North America) from a native perspective; highly illustrated, with stories, poems, eye-witness, first person accounts from native peoples on events, issues, art, mythologies, gender roles, economics, contact, sovereignty, self-determination, land, environment. Uses artifacts from the collections at the British Museum and Smithsonian.

Native American Women: A Contextual Bibliography. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1984.

Comprehensive bibliography on Native North American women, with historical commentary.

"Mythologizing Pocahontas." In Carol E. Robertson. Musical Repercussions of 1492: Encounters in Text and Performance. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992.

An examination of the representations and images—in American music—of Native American women.

"Indian Stereotypes." Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife Handbook (October): 18–21, 1980.
"Red Earth People and Southeastern Basketry," in Linda Mowat, ed. Basketmakers: Meaning and Form in Native American Baskets. Oxford, England: Pitt Rivers Museum, 1992.

A look at the history and contemporary manifestations of basketry from Native Southeastern people.

"Traditional Cultures in a Technology-Based World." Darshana: Sinhalese Journal of Culture. (Spring): 19–23. (in Sinhalese).

A proposal for constructing technological change using a culture-based approach.

"The Mickey Mouse Kachina." American Art 1, no. 1 (1992).

An examination of an object from the collections of the National Museum of American Art, which suggests the possibilities for culture change and for humor and resistance in cntemporary Native/Hopi material culture.

"Magnolias Grown in Dirt," Southern Exposure, 1977; reprinted in J. Zandy. Calling Home: Working-Class Women's Writings. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

A much-cited essay on bawdy oral traditions among Southern women, with special reference to particular traditions in my own family.

"More Than Meets the Eye: Gertrude Kasebier’s ‘Indian’ Photographs," with Helena Wright, guest editor. The History of Photography Journal (Winter 2000).

Examines the “Indian” photographs by Gertrude Kasebier, in NMAH collections, and compares her work to the clichés of 19th century Native photography.

"The Pocahontas Perplex: Images of American Indian Women in American Culture," The Massachussetts Review. 16 (Autumn): 698–714; reprinted in E. DuBois and Ruiz. Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Women's History. London: Routledge, Kegan and Paul, 1990; reprinted in S. Lobo and S. Talbot. Native American Voices: A Reader. New York: Longman, 1998.

A much-reprinted article used widely in collegiate curricula (Native Studies and Women’s Studies); deals with images and representations—visual, material, philosophical—of Native American women in American culture; the centrality of some of the representations (the Princess and the Squaw) to American popular culture and American identity.

"By The Waters of the Minnehaha: Music, Pageants and Princesses in the Indian Boarding Schools." with John Troutman. In M. Archuleta, T. Lomawaima and B. Child. Away From Home: American Indian Boarding Schools. Phoenix, AZ: The Heard Museum, 1999.

Explores government and missionary attempts to assimilate Indians in boarding schools, and many of the student’s adaptive strategies for cultural preservation and resistance.

"Native American Food," in Kirlin, eds. Smithsonian Folklife Cookbook, Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.

On Native foodways from all major cultural regions (Plains, Northwest Coast, Southeast, Northeast, Southwest) and on the death and rebirth of Native agriculture, subsistence, and food production. With recipes.

"Was Abolitionism a Failure?" The New York Times, January 30, 2015.
"Don't Throw the Bums Out" The New York Times, September 24, 2014.
"How Coffee Fueled the Civil War" The New York Times, July 9, 2014.
“Young Men for War”: The Wide Awakes and Lincoln’s 1860 Presidential Campaign Journal of American History, 96 (Sept. 2009), 357–78
"The Wild Children of Yesteryear" The New York Times, May 31, 2014.
"Anxious Youth, Then and Now" New York Times, December 31, 2013.