Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

We Are Here: 500 Years of Pueblo Resistance. Scriptwriter, artistic direction, casting for film. 14 minute documentary short film. Produced by Smithsonian Telecommunications, in association with the exhibition, American Encounters, National Museum of American History. Winner, Cine Golden Eagle, 1992.

A film which examines the Pueblo struggle to retain their land and their sovereignty in the face of invasion and domination attempts by Europeans and Americans.

"On Looking in the Mirror of An Institution," Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy Newsletter; reprinted in Northeast Indian Quarterly, Summer, 1990; The Graduate Quill, SUNY/Buffalo, April, 1991.

An article, taken from a keynote address at the opening of an exhibition on Indian education at Hampton Institute, which suggests the lessons learned for the present from an examination of a particular moment in the historical past.

"The Only Good Indian: Images of the American Indian in American Vernacular Culture," PhD Dissertation, Indiana University, 1973.

A dissertation on images and representations of American Indians in American culture, with an emphasis on visual and material representations and on oral tradition taken from collections at the Smithsonian Institution.

"Down Home In the City: A Store-Bought Remembrance." Wine, Food and the Arts, II: Works Gathered By the American Institute of Wine and Food. San Francisco: AIWF and Swan’s Island Books, 1997.

An essay on food and memory.

"The Beaded Adidas," in Charles Camp, ed. Time and Temperature: A Centennial Retrospective. Washington, DC: American Folklore Society, 1989: 66–67; reprinted in The Messenger (Wheelwright Museum Newsletter), 1989; The Runner (Smithsonian American Indian Newsletter); 1990.

A piece which examines a modern American Indian object–a pair of beaded running shoes–and comments on scholarly resistance to changing forms in American Indian expressive culture.

"Research in the Nation's Junkpile: Folklore Research in the Smithsonian Institution." Folklore Forum 5, no. 1(January, 1972).

An article, based on dissertation research at the Smithsonian, commenting on the usefulness of collections there to folklorists and researchers in American material culture.

"We Never Saw These Things Before': Southwest Indian Laughter and Resistance to the Invasion of the Tse va ho." In M. Weigle and Barbara Babcock. The Great Southwest of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway. Phoenix: The Heard Museum, 1996.

An essay on the uses of traditional and contemporary visual art and material culture as a form of resistance among Pueblos.

"The Image of the Indian in American Popular Culture" in Wilcomb Washburn, ed. The Handbook of North American Indians IV. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press: 587–606, 1989.
"An Addendum on American Indian Cultural Policies" to the Report of the American Indian Policy Review Commission. with Arnold T. Anderson et al. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1977.

An analysis of U.S. policies relative to Native American cultures (language, education, art production and preservation, music) for a federally commisioned report.

The British Museum Encyclopedia of Native North America, with Melanie Fernandez. London, Bloomington, IN, Toronto, Canada: British Museum Press, 1999.

Up-to-date histories and cultures of first peoples (North America) from a native perspective; highly illustrated, with stories, poems, eye-witness, first person accounts from native peoples on events, issues, art, mythologies, gender roles, economics, contact, sovereignty, self-determination, land, environment. Uses artifacts from the collections at the British Museum and Smithsonian.

"The Texture of Memory: Historical Process and Contemporary Art." In S. Cahan and Zoya Kocur. Contemporary Art and Multicultural Education. New York: Routledge and the New Museum for Contemporary Art, 1996.

An essay on contemporary Native visual art as commentary on history.

"Poor Lo and Dusky Ramona: Scenes From a Nineteenth Century Album on Indian America," in Jane Becker, ed. Folk Roots, New Roots: The Formation of American Folk Culture. Boston, MA: Museum of Our National Heritage: Lexington, MA, 1989.

An examination of the visual and material manifestations.

"Snail Darters, Indians and Social Impact Assessment: Resisting the Politics of Doom." Anthropology Resource Center Newsletter. 4, no. 1 (March): 1, 1980.
“Labyrinthine Walk: A Guide for Politically Incorrect Tourists,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 141–157.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism analyzes the goals of tourists when visiting museums as part of a sight-seeing ritual.

African American Photographers in Segregated America

Illustrated blog in Smithsonian Collections Blog.  A reflection about photographs of Eddie "Rochester" Anderson and Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in Clyde Stauffer's snapshot album, compiled during travels to V.F.W. posts.

“Betty Hahn: The Early Years,” essay in Betty Hahn: Photography or Maybe Not, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1995.

This essay describes the influence of Hahn's graduate school photography professor, Henry Holmes Smith, on her early work, including her revival of "obsolete" photographic processes such as gum-bichromate. Her technical and aesthetic experiments are described.

“Automatic Photobooths in Context(s),” foreword in Nakki Goranin, American Photobooth.   New York:  W.W. Norton & Co., Feb. 2008, pp. 9-13.

A psychological and cultural meditation about the unique experience of photobooth photographs, with notes about the NMAH Hall of Photography’s photobooth.

“Barbara Beirne’s Women of Southern Appalachia,” Now and Then (The Center for Appalachian Studies and Services, East Tennessee State University), Summer 1997, pp. 3–7.

A description of Barbara Beirne's aims in interviewing and photographing a number of energetic, courageous Appalachian women and how these documents highlight important aspects of Appalachian cultural, social, and economic history.

"The Scurlock Studio: A Biography," (with Donna M. Wells), Picturing the Promise: The Scurlock Studio and Black Washington.  Washington, D.C.: National Museum of African American History and Culture in collaboration with the National Museum of American history, 2009, pp. 196-212.

A history of the Scurlock family studio and its significance for the African American community of Washington.

“American Photographs in Europe and Illusions of Travel,” American Photographs in Europe, ed. by David Nye and Mick Gidley. Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Amsterdam: VU University Press, 1994, pp. 57–75.

A discussion of the interrelationship of stereograph publisher Underwood & Underwood's European sales activities and its stereoscopic documentation of Europe for both the American and European markets.

“The Archives Center and Photography: National Museum of American History,” History of Photography, Spring 2000 (Vol. 24, No. 1), p. 49.

A description of the Archives Center's photographic collections, policies, and programs, with emphasis on major recent acquisitions, such as the Scurlock Studio Records.

“The Scurlock Ninety-Year Project: Black Washington in Black America,” Exposure, vol. 32:1 (1999), pp. 64–73.

A summary of the history of the Scurlock Studio and a description of the the Museum's Scurlock collection, with remarks about conservation challenges, especially regarding deteriorating acetate negatives.

“Wayward Wife as Muse: Anais Nin and Ian Hugo,” in Anais Nin: A Book of Mirrors, ed. by Paul Herron. Huntington Woods, Mich.: Sky Blue Press, 1996, pp. 44–57.

A critical appraisal of the influence of diarist and surrealist Anais Nin on the films of her husband Ian Hugo. Nin served as muse, model, actress, and collaborator in inspiring Hugo to become a creative artist.

“Souvenirs of Roads Not Taken: Virtual Travel with the Underwood & Underwood Travel System and the World Wide Web,” in Culture as the Tourist Product, ed. by Mike Robinson, Nigel Evans, and Paul Callaghan. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, 1996, pp. 131–139.

The text of a paper delivered at a conference on tourism details the ways in which commercially published stereographs were used to simulate travel experiences, 1895-1921.

"Objects in an Exhibition: Reflections on 'Fast Attacks and Boomers." In Materializing the Military. Artefacts VI: Military Technology, ed. Bernard Finn and Barton C. Hacker. London: Science Museum Press, in press

On several key objects in an exhibition on submarines in the Cold War and how they contributed to the exhibition theme

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