Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"The Pocahontas Perplex: Images of American Indian Women in American Culture," The Massachussetts Review. 16 (Autumn): 698–714; reprinted in E. DuBois and Ruiz. Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Women's History. London: Routledge, Kegan and Paul, 1990; reprinted in S. Lobo and S. Talbot. Native American Voices: A Reader. New York: Longman, 1998.

A much-reprinted article used widely in collegiate curricula (Native Studies and Women’s Studies); deals with images and representations—visual, material, philosophical—of Native American women in American culture; the centrality of some of the representations (the Princess and the Squaw) to American popular culture and American identity.

"By The Waters of the Minnehaha: Music, Pageants and Princesses in the Indian Boarding Schools." with John Troutman. In M. Archuleta, T. Lomawaima and B. Child. Away From Home: American Indian Boarding Schools. Phoenix, AZ: The Heard Museum, 1999.

Explores government and missionary attempts to assimilate Indians in boarding schools, and many of the student’s adaptive strategies for cultural preservation and resistance.

"American Indian Women: Diverse Leadership for Social Change" in Albrecht and Brewer, eds. Bridges of Power: Women's Multicultural Alliances. Santa Cruz, Calif.: New Society Publishers, 1990; re-edited from “Culture and Gender in Indian America,” Sojourner: The Women's Forum 15 (September, 1989).

An essay which sets out some of the historical and cultural perameters of Native gender roles, cultural change, and political power in Native America.

Pissing in the Snow And Other Ozark Folktales, editing and "Introduction," by Vance Randolph. Champaign-Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1976; ix–xxix; Avon Paper edition, 1977. In print, University of Illinois Press, 1999, in its 15th edition; in print and in its 20th edition, 2003.

A collection of heretofore-unpublished tales of the noted Ozark collector and folklorist, Vance Randolph, which I edited and brought to publication.

From Ritual to Retail: Pueblos, Tourism and the Fred Harvey Company. Producer/Director. 17 minute documentary short video. Produced in association with the exhibition, Inventing the Southwest: The Fred Harvey Company and Native American Art, 1995, Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ.

A film which explores the impact of the Fred Harvey Company and early 20th century tourism on Native art and culture.

The British Museum Encyclopedia of Native North America, with Melanie Fernandez. London, Bloomington, IN, Toronto, Canada: British Museum Press, 1999.

Up-to-date histories and cultures of first peoples (North America) from a native perspective; highly illustrated, with stories, poems, eye-witness, first person accounts from native peoples on events, issues, art, mythologies, gender roles, economics, contact, sovereignty, self-determination, land, environment. Uses artifacts from the collections at the British Museum and Smithsonian.

"American Indian Art in Oklahoma" Oklahoma Today Special Issue on American Indian Art, (December, 1990).
"Vance Randolph's 'Unprintable' Tales." Mid-South Folklore. 3, no.3 (1976).

An article on bringing Vance Randolph’s “bawdy” Ozark folktales to print.

Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women, 1995, and Heartbeat II, 1998. Producer, with Howard Bass. CD/audiocassette recording. 79 minutes. Smithsonian Folkways.

A landmark sound recording in 2 volumes, of the music of contemporary American Indian women.

"Kill the Indian and Save The Man: Indian Education in the United States." Introduction to To Lead and To Serve: Indian Education at Hampton Institute, 1978–1923. an exhibition catalog. Charlottesville: Virginia Foundation on Humanities and Public Policy, 1989.

An introduction to an exhibition on Indian education at Hampton Institute with a brief history and analysis of US policy and practice in the education of Indians in the 19th and twentieth centuries.

"Traits of Indian Character: The 'Indian' Anecdote in American Vernacular Culture." Southern Folklore Quarterly. 39 (September, 1976).

An article on a particular genre of oral tradition, the anecdote, and its appearance in oral tradition relative to images and representations of Indians.

Corn Is Who We Are: Pueblo Indian Food. Co-Director (scripting, casting, artistic direction, edit) for film. 20 minute documentary short film. Produced by Alturas Films and Smithsonian Telecommunications. Winner, Silver Apple, National Educational Film Festival, 1994; English Spanish language versions.

A film that explores the centrality of corn to Pueblo culture, history and health and the death and rebirth of corn agriculture in Pueblo country.

"On Looking in the Mirror of An Institution," Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy Newsletter; reprinted in Northeast Indian Quarterly, Summer, 1990; The Graduate Quill, SUNY/Buffalo, April, 1991.

An article, taken from a keynote address at the opening of an exhibition on Indian education at Hampton Institute, which suggests the lessons learned for the present from an examination of a particular moment in the historical past.

"The Only Good Indian: Images of the American Indian in American Vernacular Culture," PhD Dissertation, Indiana University, 1973.

A dissertation on images and representations of American Indians in American culture, with an emphasis on visual and material representations and on oral tradition taken from collections at the Smithsonian Institution.

We Are Here: 500 Years of Pueblo Resistance. Scriptwriter, artistic direction, casting for film. 14 minute documentary short film. Produced by Smithsonian Telecommunications, in association with the exhibition, American Encounters, National Museum of American History. Winner, Cine Golden Eagle, 1992.

A film which examines the Pueblo struggle to retain their land and their sovereignty in the face of invasion and domination attempts by Europeans and Americans.

"Virgins, Booze, and American Elections," New York Times, April 8, 2016.
"Don't Throw the Bums Out" New York Times, September 12, 2014
"How Coffee Fueled the Civil War," New York Times, July 9, 2014
"The Wild Children of Yesteryear" New York Times, May 31, 2014
The Virgin Vote: How Young Americans Made Democracy Social, Politics Personal, and Voting Popular in the Nineteenth Century Forthcoming, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.

The Virgin Vote uncovers the forgotten role young men and women played in American politics from 1840 through 1900. Drawing on hundreds of unpublished diaries and letters – by barmaids and belles, sharecroppers and cowboys – it explores the way children, youths, and young adults used democracy to win maturity. At the same time, parents and politicians trained children to be “violent little partisans” and pushed young men to assert their masculinity by casting their “virgin votes” at age twenty-one, pushing voter turnouts to historic peaks. On a personal level, youths used democracy to win adulthood, while on a structural level politicians used youths to maintain political power.

"Anxious Youth, Then and Now" New York Times, December 31, 2013
"D.I.Y. Education Before YouTube," The New York Times, July 11, 2015.
"When the Civil War Came to New York," New York Times, July 13, 2013
"Was Abolitionism a Failure?" The New York Times, January 30, 2015.
"Don't Throw the Bums Out" The New York Times, September 24, 2014.

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