Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Military Institutions, Weapons, and Social Change: Toward a New History of Military Technology." Technology and Culture 35 (1994): 768–834.

On the historiography of military technology, including the role of museums.

“Gunpowder and the Changing Military Order: The Islamic Gunpowder Empires, ca. 1450–ca. 1650.” In The Heirs of Archimedes: Technology, Science and Warfare, 1350–1800, ed. Brett D. Steele and Tamera L. Dorland. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, in press.

The adoption of gunpowder weapons tended to strengthen central governments against regional powers.

"Technology and Research." In Encyclopedia of the American Military, ed. John J. Jessup and Louise B. Ketz, 1373–1414. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1994.

Overview of the development of American military technology, from colonial times to the present.

“Military Science.” In Cambridge History of Modern Science, vol. 8, Science in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, ed. David Livingstone and Ronald L. Numbers et al. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, in press.

Links between military and scientific institutions expanded and intensified during the 19th and 20th centuries.

"Engineering and Science." In Encyclopedia of the American Military, ed John J. Jessup and Louise B. Ketz, 1415–44. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1994.

Overview of relationships between science, engineering, and American military institutions, from colonial times to the present.

"Military Technology and World History: A Reconnaissance." The History Teacher 30 (August 1997): 461–487.

Military technological innovation has profoundly influenced the course of world history since earliest times.

West Point in the Making of America. with Margaret Vining. Irvington, N.Y.: Hydra, 2002.

Catalog of the West Point in the Making of America exhibition.

“The World of Camp and Train: The Changing Role of Women in Early Modern Armies.” with Margaret Vining. In Sovereign Arms: Armies and Fleets in the World between Lepanto and the French Revolution, 1571–1789, Rome, 2002.

On the necessary and vital roles women served in supporting the activities of early modern armies.

"Science and Technology in the Nineteenth Century." In A Guide to the Sources of United States Military History: Supplement IV, ed.Robin Higham and Donald J. Mrozek, 82–117. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1998.

Bibliographical essay focused on recent scholarship on the interaction of science and technology with American military institutions in the 19th century.

“From Camp Follower to Lady in Uniform: Women, Social Class and Military Institutions before 1920.” with Margaret Vining. Contemporary European History 10 (2001): 353–73.

Relationships between women and military institutions altered radically from the mid-19th century to World War I, reflecting the changing social status of both women and the military.

"Military Institutions and the Labor Process: Noneconomic Sources of Technological Change, Women's Subordination, and the Organization of Work." with Sally L. Hacker. Technology and Culture 28 (1987): 743–75.

Society and economy are as much products as causes of military and technological change.

“Volunteers Inspired by Conscription: Uniformed Women in World War I.” with Margaret Vining. In Total War, Total Defense, 1789–1900, ed. Per Iko et al., 346–52. Stockholm: Svenska militärhistorika kommissionen, 2001.

Civilian women in large numbers volunteered for military-related health and welfare services in World War I, donning military-style uniforms as a symbolic claim to full citizenship.

“The Convergence of History and Military Museums,” with Margaret Vining. In Acta of the Asociacion de amigos de los museos militares, Madrid, Nov. 2003, in press.

Military museums and history museums arose from distinct traditions, but in recent years have come increasingly to share common views on how to exhibition military history.

"Uniforms Make the Woman." with Margaret Vining. In Materializing the Military. Artefacts VI: Military Technology, ed. Bernard Finn and Barton C. Hacker. London: Science Museum Press, in press

In the 1920s, a Smithsonian exhibition of women's uniforms validated women's World War I contributions and expanded political roles.

“Military Patronage and the Geophysical Sciences in the United States: An Introduction.” Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences 30:2 (2000): 1–5.

Military funding has shaped the development of American meteorology, oceanography, geology, geodesy, and other earth sciences.

“Comment on Josef Lange.” In Research Budgets in an Age of Limits: American-European Comparative Perspectives, ed. Klaus-Dirk Henke et al., 122–24. Europäische Schriften zu Staat und Wirtschaft 2. Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2000.

On military funding for scientific research.

"Industrial Armies: From Industrial Revolution to World War." Acta of the International Congress of Military History, Rabat (Morocco), August 2004, in press

On the interaction of industrial and military institutions from the 18th century to World War I

“Nuclear Weapons.” In The Oxford Companion to United States History, ed. Paul S. Boyer et al., 562–63. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Overview of U.S. nuclear weapons development from World War II to the present.

World Military History Bibliography: Premodern and Nonwestern Military Institutions and Warfare. History of Warfare, vol. 16. Leiden: Brill, 2003.

Annotated bibliography of works published 1967–97.

On the Shoulders of Titans: A History of Project Gemini, with James M. Grimwood. Washington: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2002. Reprint of 1977 edition.

Documented narrative history of the second U.S. manned spaceflight project during the 1960s.

“The 400–Years War: Conquest and Acculturation in the Military Struggle for North America.” In Coming to the Americas: The Eurasian Military Impact on the Development of North America, ed. John Lynn, 107–35. Wheaton, IL: Cantigny First Division Foundation, 2003.

Until the 19th century, North American Indians successfully confined European settlement to the area east of the Appalachians and south of the Great Plains by adapting European technology and exploiting European enmities.

“Out of the Shadows: Images of Women’s Military Work, 1500–1920,” with Margaret Vining. In War, Media and Military from Guteburg to Today, ed. M. E. Ionescu, 164-75. Bucharest: Military Publishing House, 2004.

Graphic images of women in military settings document women's changing military roles from the 16th century through World War I.

“Western Military Technology and East Asian Modernization in the 19th Century.” In Modernization in China and East Asia, 1850–1950, ed. Edouard Vermeer and Dong Zhenghue, in press.

Adoption of Western weapons played a key role in the modernization of East Asian states.

The Boy and His Press. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American History, 1992.

Amateur and young printers in the 19th century.

Patent Models in the Graphic Arts Collection, (Washington, DC: National Museum of American History, 1997).

Lists Graphic Arts Collection patent models from the following groups: Printing presses and stamps; Press-related apparatus; Compositors' tools; Type; Plate, stone, and block making; Bookbinding; Copying and autographic printing (with stencils and pantographs); Picture framing; Miscellaneous.

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