Frederick Douglass Hand Puppet

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Description (Brief)
This large arm puppet represents Frederick Douglas, the renowned 19thC abolitionist, journalist and statesman. Like the other two puppets, Douglas is made of soft plush fabric and batting and is dressed in 19thC style. Douglas is one of three puppets created to celebrate the 150th birthday of Lewis Latimer (1848-1928) an African American scientist, inventor and engineer.
The Lemelson Center at the NMAH is dedicated to developing programs to interest and stimulate young people to study and explore the sciences of invention and innovation. In 1998, the Lemelson Center of the Museum of American History commissioned the Brewery Troupe of Freeport, New York, to create puppets that could be used in their education program"Lewis Latimer: The Renaissance Man". In addition to Douglas, puppets representing Lewis Latimer and Thomas Edison were created for the program.
The Brewery Troupe' was founded in 1973, by Brad Brewer, an accomplished puppeteer who trained under Jim Henson and performed puppetry shows on TV and the stage. The Brewery Troupe's goal is to interpret African American literature, music and humor through the arts of the puppet theater.
Location
Currently not on view
Date made
1998
transferring agency
Lemelson Center
depicted
Douglass, Frederick
user
Brewery Troupe, Inc.
maker
Brewery Troupe, Inc.
place made
United States: New York, Freeport
Associated Place
United States: New York, New York
Physical Description
fabric (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 124.5 cm x 53.25 cm; 49 in x 20 15/16 in
ID Number
1999.0144.03
accession number
1999.0144
catalog number
1999.0144.03
subject
Puppetry
Anti-Slavery
African American
Blacks
See more items in
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Puppets
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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