Microscope

Description
Hideyo Noguchi (1876-1928) was a Japanese bacteriologist who moved to the U.S. in 1900 to work with Simon Flexner at the University of Pennsylvania. A few years later, having gone with Dr. Flexner to the newly-established Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York, Dr. Noguchi used this microscope to study of the causal agent of syphilis.
This is a compound monocular with coarse and fine focus, triple nosepiece, large circular stage covered with vulcanite, trunnion, Abbé illuminating apparatus, black horseshoe base, and wooden box with extra lenses. The “CARL ZEISS / JENA” logo, introduced in 1904, appears on the tube. The serial number is 51900.
Ref: Eimer & Amend, Microscopes and Microscopical Accessories (Jena, 1902), pp. 50-51.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
microscope
date made
1902-1927
user
Noguchi, Hideyo
maker
Zeiss, Carl
Physical Description
wood (overall material)
brass (overall material)
glass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
black (overall color)
Measurements
average spatial: 31 cm x 14.5 cm x 17.8 cm; 12 3/16 in x 5 11/16 in x 7 in
average spatial: 37.4 cm x 20.6 cm x 20.8 cm; 14 3/4 in x 8 1/8 in x 8 3/16 in
place made
Deutschland: Thüringen, Jena
associated place
Germany
United States: New York, New York
ID Number
MG*M-09352
accession number
224610
catalog number
M-09352
subject
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Microscopes
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Microscopes
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift of Rockefeller Institute through Dr. Detlev W. Bronk, President
Additional Media

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