Tintype of Parade Marcher, 1860

Tintype of Parade Marcher, 1860

Description
Tintype picturing Lincoln “Wide Awake” marcher wearing oilcloth cape and cap, holding pole and torch, 1860.
The successful presidential campaign of Republican Abraham Lincoln perfected the nighttime torchlight parade as an entertainment of unprecedented scale that attracted the attention of men, women, and children. The concept originated in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1858, and was revived for Lincoln’s campaign by the city’s young Republicans. Tailored oil-resistant enameled cloth capes distinguished the marchers, some of whom were too young to vote. Their example spread from Hartford to cities in the northeastern United States, which contributed traveling companies totaling some ten thousand uniformed men with torches to a Grand Procession in New York City on October 3, 1860. The martial spectacle—including fireworks, Lincoln “Wide Awake” transparencies, and floats—created envy among the city’s Democrats, and panic among southern sympathizers who regarded the torch-lit parade as a provocation.
Location
Currently not on view
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 4 3/4 in x 3 1/4 in; 12.065 cm x 8.255 cm
ID Number
1982.0180.01
catalog number
1982.0180.01
accession number
1982.0180
subject
Political Campaigns
See more items in
Political History: Political History, General History Collection
Government, Politics, and Reform
American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith
Data Source
National Museum of American History

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