Elizabeth Throckmorton's Sampler

Description
This sampler features a two story house with windows and two chimneys on a stepped hill with grazing sheep. The stepped hill can be found on samplers from Philadelphia, western Maryland and New Jersey. There is a center angel and two apple baskets are on either side above the inscription. The motif of an angel means a messenger of God and the apple baskets often represent fertility and wealth. There is a three-sided geometric border, with queen stitch strawberries and leaves. (a more difficult stitch) The sampler is stitched with silk embroidery thread on a linen ground with a thread count of warp 28, weft 28/in. The stitches used are cross, queen, satin, and straight.
Elizabeth Throckmorton was born on October 18, 1795, in Monmouth County, New Jersey to Holmes (c.1759 –1821) and Susannah Forman (1762-1820) Throckmorton. Her father served in the American Revolution for three years. She married John Britton on November 18, 1813, and they had three children - John, Mary, and Catharine. Her husband John died c.1822-1823. She married Tobias Worrel on October 26, 1824, and they had a daughter Jane. According to the 1840 census they were then living in Des Moines, Iowa.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
sampler
date made
1804-1806
maker
Throckmorton, Elizabeth
Physical Description
silk (overall material)
linen (ground material)
embroidery (overall production method/technique)
Measurements
overall: 13 3/4 in x 13 1/2 in; 34.925 cm x 34.29 cm
place made
United States: New Jersey
ID Number
1990.0477.01
catalog number
1990.0477.01
accession number
1990.0477
subject
Textiles
Samplers
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Textiles
Samplers
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift from Mrs. Katherine Stahmer

Visitor Comments

5/23/2016 8:57:51 PM
Kristen Morgan
I was so excited to see this. Elizabeth was the daughter of my 6th great-grandparents, Holmes and Susannah Forman Throckmorton. Will this piece ever be displayed in a collection and/or is there a way to see it at the Smithsonian?
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