Franz Schmidt & Haensch Saccharimeter

Description
This is a Soleil-Scheibler saccharimeter marked "Franz Schmidt & Haensch BERLIN Newe Schönhauser Str No. 882." The address indicates that it was made between 1869 and 1877.
Jean Baptiste François Soleil, an optical instrument maker in Paris, described the saccharimeter in 1845. Carl Scheibler, director of the research institute of the Association of the German Beet Sugar Industry, modified Soleil’s design in 1869. He added a second tube for reading the scale, and a rod with wheel and pinion for rotating the polarizer.
Scheibler also replaced the arbitrary scale used on French instruments with the scale devised by the German sugar chemist, Carl Ventzke. Each degree of the Ventzke scale is one-hundredth part of the rotation produced in the plane of polarization of white light in a column 200 millimeters long, by a solution of pure sucrose at 17.5 degrees C.
In this example, the scale is ivory, linear, graduated every degree from -30 to 0 to +100, and read by vernier to .5 degrees. Also present are two glass observation tubes suitable for carrying 100 and 200 mm of liquid, a brass cylinder 200 mm long, and a wooden box. The base is missing.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
saccharimeter
maker
Franz Schmidt & Haensch
Physical Description
wood (overall material)
brass (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 21 1/2 in x 6 1/4 in x 4 in; 54.61 cm x 15.875 cm x 10.16 cm
place made
Deutschland: Berlin, Berlin
ID Number
PH*328767
catalog number
328767
accession number
308252
subject
Optics
Sugar
Germany
Measuring & Mapping
Saccharimeters
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Physical Sciences
Saccharimeters
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Media

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