Cheerio Practice Yo-Yo

Description (Brief)
This type of wooden Cheerio brand yo-yo was made by Wilfred Schlee during the 1950s and 1960s in Ontario, Canada. It has flat sides and a pale green and white design. There is a gold, red and black foil sticker on one side reading “Tested and Approved for Practice, Tournament Practice Cheerio, Return Top 25, By Official Worlds Champions.” Cheerio was the best selling yo-yo brand in Canada and England during the 1930s, and became one of the Duncan Toy Company's main U.S. competitors after World War II.
Location
Currently not on view
maker
Cheerio
Place Made
United States
Physical Description
wood (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 3 cm x 5.5 cm; x 1 3/16 in x 2 3/16 in
ID Number
2002.0246.18
accession number
2002.0246
catalog number
2002.0246.18
See more items in
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Yo-Yos
Sports & Leisure
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Comments

"When my husband was in public school during the war he became involved with the Cheerio Yo Yo company in Toronto Canada.He became very good at it and one day while demonstrating at the Eaton Centre in Toronto the string broke and it hit a crystal chandelier He is 86 now with a memory problem.Down through the years we always enjoyed watching him make the yo yo do everything but talk, but never thought to ask about the circumstances that led up to this knowledge. Since it was an important part of his like, I feel it needs to be mentioned in writing the history of his life. All he can remember is someone coming to Leslie Street school and showing them how to do the tricks. He said he had several badges, but only one is left. In white tread it says 99 Cheerio YoYo. In red Silver Award. Is there a Yo Yo Museum In Toronto that would have information on that old Cheerio company before it was bought out . Like what procedure did they use to connect with the yougsters during the war years and up to 1945. Any name and address, especially in Toronto, that might be able to help me, would be most appreciated. Thank you Beatrice Martingale."

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