Crayola Crayons

Description
Cherished by generations of child artists, Crayola crayons were invented in 1903 by the Binney & Smith Company of Easton, Pennsylvania. Using paraffin wax and nontoxic pigments, the company produced a coloring stick that was safe, sturdy, and affordable. The name "Crayola," coined by the wife of the company's founder, comes from "craie," French for "chalk," and "oleaginous," or "oily."
This Crayola set for "young artists" was one of the earliest produced. Its twenty-eight colors include celestial blue, golden ochre, rose pink, and burnt sienna. The box is marked, "No. 51, Young Artists Drawing Crayons, for coloring Maps, Pictures" and contains twenty two of the original 28 crayons. Crayons are icons of American childhood that recall our collective memory for coloring both inside and outside the lines. Affordable and easily obtainable, they have transformed art education and fostered creativity in schools and homes, providing color to children for generations.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
crayons, box of
Date made
1903
maker
Binney and Smith
Physical Description
wax (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 2 1/2 in x 7 3/4 in x 1/2 in; 6.35 cm x 19.685 cm x 1.27 cm
Place Made
United States: Pennsylvania, Easton
ID Number
2000.0073.41
accession number
2000.0073
catalog number
2000.0073.41
subject
Art
Family & Social Life
Popular Entertainment
National Treasures exhibit
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Education
National Treasures exhibit
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Related Publication
Kendrick, Kathleen M. and Peter C. Liebhold. Smithsonian Treasures of American History
Publication title
Treasures of American History online exhibition
Publication author
National Museum of American History
Publication URL
http://americanhistory.si.edu/treasures
Additional Media

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