Termatrex Card Rack with Punch Cards

This green vertical file holds five groups of plastic cards with cards colored differently in each group. A small tab is attached to the top of each card. A mark on the bottom of one card reads: TERMATREX SYSTEMS R (/) RANDOM NUMERIC CARD (/) RE-ORDER NO. RN-TC-1000. A mark on another card reads: c 1960 JONKER Corporation (/) GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND (/) PRINTED IN U.S.A. A mark on the rack reads: JONKER.
For a description of the Termatrex data retrieval system, with references, see 1993.0132.01. For a card reader, see 1993.0132.02. For documentation, see 1993.3065.
Currently not on view
Object Name
card rack with punch cards
date made
ca 1969
Jonker Business Machines, Inc.
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
overall: 32.1 cm x 26.7 cm x 22.2 cm; 12 5/8 in x 10 1/2 in x 8 3/4 in
place made
United States: Maryland, Gaithersburg
ID Number
catalog number
accession number
Conservation History
Science & Mathematics
Tabulating Equipment
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Tabulating Equipment
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Transfer from Smithsonian Institution Conservation Analytical Laboratory

Visitor Comments

10/2/2015 11:38:29 AM
Robert B. Green
Fred Jonkers started Termatrex systems in 1960. My father Wallace Hughes Green worked at Termatrex from 1968 - 1992. He was vice president of production and was directly responsible for the manufacture of the Termatrex reader system. In 1975 the owners of Termatrex changed the name of the company to Remac but retained the Termatrex brand as a retrieval data system. My father purchased the Termatrex name and production facility in 1975 and ceased operations in 1992. I worked there for years while in high school and college and am throughly familiar with the equipment, its manufacturing process and how the retrieval systems works. For nearly 30 years it was the most simple data retrieval systems of its kind in the world. How it works and stores data is an amazing piece of pre-computer technology.
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