Singer Sewing Machine

Description
This Singer industrial 31-15 straight stitch sewing machine head was made around 1910 and was a workhorse of the apparel industry. Most garment factories ran the machines off of floor mounted line shafting but the machines could also be operated by foot powered treadles. This machine was last used at the J. Schoeneman men’s suit factory in PA.
Charismatic inventor Isaac Merritt Singer did much to improve and popularize the sewing machine but it was company president Edward Clark that turned the company into a giant. The company excelled at clever marketing. It opened factories and sales offices around the world. By 1900 Singer was multinational. Singer Manufacturing pioneered many new business techniques. It instituted installment sales, sought to develop a home-user market, modernized manufacturing, and expanded into international sales.
maker
Singer
Measurements
overall: 12 1/2 in x 20 1/2 in x 7 1/2 in; 31.75 cm x 52.07 cm x 19.05 cm
ID Number
1995.3067.01
catalog number
1995.3067.01
nonaccession number
1995.3067
Credit Line
Gift of J. Schoeneman, Incorporated through Ron Palczynski
See more items in
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Work
Sweatshops
Exhibition
America on the Move
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History

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