Painting, Thomas Battersby

The Thomas Battersby was built in New Brunswick, Canada in 1825 by John Wilson. The ship measured 102 feet long and 323 tons. The Thomas Battersby was owned by Richard Battersby, and its home port was reported as Belfast. Thomas Battersby was built as a scow and rerigged by 1845 as a brig. It was in the cotton trade between Liverpool and New Orleans, and was last listed in the Lloyd's register in 1847.
The painting shows two views of the same ship, the view of the stern employed to show the name of the ship. Liverpool is visible in the back ground with a good view of the industrial buildings. There are several smaller craft in the painting.
Artist Miles Walters was born in 1774 and died in 1849. He was a shipwright, and later a seaman. After leaving the sea Miles moved to London. He later moved to Liverpool with third son Samuel Walters (1811-1882), where he was listed in the directories as an artist. He worked on several pieces with his son Samuel who studied at the Liverpool Mechanics School of Arts. Samuel became one of the most popular marine painters of his time.
Currently not on view
Object Name
painting, oil
date made
Walters, Miles
Walters, Samuel
Physical Description
oil on canvas (overall material)
without frame: 23 in x 38 in; 58.42 cm x 96.52 cm
with frame: 27 1/2 in x 42 1/2 in; 69.85 cm x 107.95 cm
ID Number
accession number
catalog number
Cigna Maritime Collection
See more items in
Work and Industry: Maritime
Cigna Maritime Collection
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift of CIGNA Museum and Art Collection

Visitor Comments

10/26/2015 1:39:01 PM
Alice Elizabeth Battersby
This ship is named after my Gt Gt Gt Grandfather Thomas Battersby. His burial place is in Templepatrick Graveyard County Antrim N. Ireland. There is a full headstone there giving all family details. I live near Belfast A. Wilson (Battersby).
Add a comment about this object

**Please read before submitting the form**

Have a comment or question about this object to share with the community? Please use the form below. Selected comments will appear on this page and may receive a museum response (but we can't promise). Please note that we generally cannot answer questions about the history, rarity, or value of your personal artifacts.

Have a question about anything else, or would you prefer a personal response? Please visit our FAQ or contact page.

Personal information will not be shared or result in unsolicited e-mail. See our privacy policy.

Enter the characters shown in the image.