Painting, Wooden Barque William Ritson

The William Ritson was built at Maryport, Cumberland, England in 1864 by Ritson, a merchant family in Whitehaven. It measured 164 feet in length and 680 tons. The ship was owned by F. Johnston and Company and was registered at Mayport until 1884. Ownership passed to Kayton and Simpson until 1890, when the ship was sold to Argentinean owners. Shortly after that, in 1891 it was sold again and renamed Hiram. It was broken up in 1905. The painting depicts the William Ritson under full sail, heading into a harbor. The port side of the ship is shown with the bow tilted upward. The ship is calling for a pilot. Also pictured in the background are Skerries lighthouse and Anglesey. The painting has been variously attributed to either J. Scott (1840-1872) or Samuel Walters (1811-1882). See CIGNA catalogue entry for details.
Currently not on view
Object Name
painting, oil
date made
ca 1867
Scott, John
Physical Description
oil on canvas (overall material)
without frame: 26 in x 46 in; 66.04 cm x 116.84 cm
with frame: 31 1/4 in x 51 in; 79.375 cm x 129.54 cm
ID Number
accession number
catalog number
Cigna Maritime Collection
See more items in
Work and Industry: Maritime
Cigna Maritime Collection
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift of CIGNA Museum and Art Collection
Additional Media

Visitor Comments

Add a comment about this object

**Please read before submitting the form**

Have a comment or question about this object to share with the community? Please use the form below. Selected comments will appear on this page and may receive a museum response (but we can't promise). Please note that we generally cannot answer questions about the history, rarity, or value of your personal artifacts.

Have a question about anything else, or would you prefer a personal response? Please visit our FAQ or contact page.

Personal information will not be shared or result in unsolicited e-mail. See our privacy policy.

Enter the characters shown in the image.