Fairmount Fire Company Fire Hat

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Description
The emblem painted on this Fairmount Fire Company's parade hat was inspired by William Rush's sculpture entitled "Nymph and Bittern." This somewhat feminine symbol seems unusual until the history of the sculpture is known. The artwork was part of a fountain commissioned to commemorate the completion of Philadelphia's new water system in 1822. The system was state-of-the-art, and the statue was considered the best piece of public art in America. Wearing these hats linked the Fairmount Company with Philadelphia's technological advancement, cultural supremacy, and proud fire fighting history.
Date made
1820-1860
associated
Rush, William
maker
Shotwell & Garden
Place Made
United States
location of statue in painting
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Physical Description
painted (overall production method/technique)
pressed felt (overall material)
red (overall color)
black (underbrim color)
gold (deocation and lettering color)
cream (painted figure color)
paint (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 5 1/2 in x 12 1/2 in x 14 1/2 in; 13.97 cm x 31.75 cm x 36.83 cm
ID Number
2005.0233.0037
catalog number
2005.0233.0037
accession number
2005.0233
Credit Line
Gift of CIGNA Museum and Art Collection
subject
Fire Fighting
Fraternal Associations
Nymph and Bittern
Hydrants
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Fire Fighting and Law Enforcement
Cultures & Communities
Work
Artifact Walls exhibit
Clothing & Accessories
Art
Family & Social Life
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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