C.G. Griswold's Family Salve, or Plaster

C.G. Griswold's Family Salve, or Plaster

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Description
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are:
For corns, callouses, warts, hangnails, insect bites, and general use.
Location
Currently not on view
date made
before 1955
maker
Griswold Salve Corporation
place made
United States: Connecticut, Hartford
Physical Description
paper (container material)
oleate of lead (drug active ingredients)
Measurements
overall: 4 3/4 in x 3/4 in; 12.065 cm x 1.905 cm
ID Number
2008.0018.116
accession number
2008.0018
catalog number
2008.0018.116
Credit Line
Gift of Richard W. Pollay
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Beauty and Hygiene Products: Cure-alls
Health & Medicine
Beauty and Health
Data Source
National Museum of American History

Comments

I have several small pieces of Griswold's Salve and one full piece, still in its original wrapping. It was originally sold by Sisson Drug in Hartford, CT. Three ingredients on the label are olive oil, rosin, and Oleate of Lead. It's a stick of hard, black material. To use it, one uses a match to melt a little, then put the melted "salve" on a bandaid or piece of gauze pad, then apply that -- with the warm "salve" directly on the location of a sliver -- and tape it in place. The only thing it's used for that I know if is to "draw out" a sliver. I just used it for that purpose yesterday and this morning the deep-sliver location looks quite good. I'll put it on again overnight and expect the situation to be cleared tomorrow morning. I'm 82 and remember my grandfather having this stuff.
Griswold plaster also removed deeply embedded splinters. It was like magic! I have one tiny piece of griswold plaster left that is used for that purpose...nothing else is as effective. Lead based or not, it’s great stuff!
I remember my first mother-in-law had a package that she had kept long after production stopped. She swore by it, and I used it for splinters. It was fantastic. I also have a remnant that I've kept from the time that I found it, still stocked on a druggist's shelf, before I moved to Pennsylvania in 1986. For what limited use it had, I can't imagine what the big deal was about the lead content.

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