Whitall Tatum Paperweight

Description
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
Whitall, Tatum & Company of Millville, New Jersey was formed in 1901 and employed first-rate craftsmen who created outstanding paperweights.
This Whitall, Tatum and Company pedestal paperweight features an opaque, rich yellow twelve-petal flower, freely suspended in a clear glass ball. The pointed center flower petals suggest that it is the work of glassmaker Emil Stanger.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
paperweight
date made
1905-1912
maker
Whitall, Tatum and Company
Physical Description
glass (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 3 27/32 in x 3 11/16 in; 9.779 cm x 9.398 cm
place made
United States: New Jersey, Millville
ID Number
CE*60.96
catalog number
60.96
accession number
211475
subject
Paperweights
Art
Domestic Furnishings
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Paperweights
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Aaron and Lillie Straus

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