National Prohibition Act Prescription Form For Medicinal Liquor

While the production, transport, and sale of liquor was illegal during Prohibition, the National Prohibition Act allowed alcohol for medicinal and religious use. This loophole was often exploited as a way to acquire alcohol, but it required a prescription that cost $3 from the doctor and another $3 or $4 to get it filled from a pharmacist. A doctor could prescribe up to a pint of a certain kind of liquor, or Spiritus frumenti [spirits of grain], the official medical name for whisky. This prescription for a pint of whisky was prescribed on October 21, 1929 and filled the same day.
Currently not on view
Object Name
prescription form, medicinal whiskey
date made
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
overall: 11.5 cm x 14.2 cm; 4 17/32 in x 5 19/32 in
ID Number
catalog number
accession number
Health & Medicine
American Enterprise
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Medicine
American Enterprise
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift of Gary P. and Sandra Baden
Additional Media

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