Phillips 66 Gasoline Sign

Description
Building Route 66 in the mid-1920s stirred public excitement. Motorists could anticipate an all-weather route from Chicago to Los Angeles and reduced dependence on passenger trains. One symbol of infatuation with the new highway is the Phillips 66 gasoline trade name. Introduced in 1927, the name was inspired by a test drive at 66 miles per hour on a stretch of Route 66 in Oklahoma. The Phillips 66 sign, unveiled in 1930, combined the trade name with the shape of a US highway route marker. The sign has continued in use with minor revisions. This example was made in 1956.
Object Name
sign
date made
1956
Physical Description
steel (overall material)
porcelain enamel (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 76 cm x 75 cm x 2 mm; 29 29/32 in x 29 17/32 in x 3/32 in
ID Number
1996.0387.01
accession number
1996.0387
catalog number
1996.0387.01
See more items in
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Transportation
Road Transportation
Exhibition
Exhibition
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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