TOPOGRAPHICAL Map OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SURVEYED IN THE YEARS 1856 ’57 ’58 & ’59 BY A. BOSCHKE.

Description
Albert Boschke (b. 1823) was a German-born civil engineer who served as a draftsman for the U.S. Coast Survey. Realizing that there was no modern map of the District of Columbia, he organized a team of surveyors to rectify this situation. Boschke’s first map of the area, done on his own time and with his own funds, was published in 1857.
An improved map was in the hands of the printer in 1861 when the Civil War broke out and Boschke was stationed in Boston. Fearing an attack by Confederate forces, the U.S. Army seized the copper plates and printed maps from the printers, and eventually paid them about $8,500 for this material. Many years later, living in California and in need of money, Boschke asked Congress to pay $25,000 for his property. Although Congress granted his petition, the money did not appear. Boschke sued the government but to no avail.
This is a reduced version of the Boschke map, with “COUNTY ROADS AS CORRECTED TO 1880.” We have not determined who published it.
Ref: Marcus Baker, “Surveys and Maps of the District of Columbia,” National Geographic 6 (November 1, 1894): 149-178, on 156-158.
Wilhemus Bogart Bryan, Bibliography of the District of Columbia (Washington, D.C., 1900), p. 121.
“A. Boschke v. the United States,” in Cases Decided in the Court of Claims of the United States 44 (1910): 397-408.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
map
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 19 in x 22 in; 48.26 cm x 55.88 cm
ID Number
PH*317490
accession number
230397
catalog number
317490
subject
Civil War
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Physical Sciences
Measuring & Mapping
Prints from the Physical Sciences Collection
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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