New System of Modern Geography, Vol. 1

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Description
This edition of William Guthrie’s A New System of Modern Geography was published by Matthew Carey of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1795. This book is the first of two volumes, the second can be seen in object DL*006866.22. This is the first American edition, revised to update errors. The revision also set out to change the British bias as the book was originally “calculated to flatter the grossest prejudices of the English nation at the expense of every other part of the human species.” These early geographical grammars were used to teach children their geography, and included tests in the back to quiz them on their knowledge.
The Copp Collection contains about 150 books of early American imprint and shows a wide range of reading matter typical of a New England Puritan family living in a port town. Literacy was expected of many New Englanders, as Puritan doctrine required everyone to read the Bible. The abundance of multiple Bibles, psalms, hymnodies, sermons, and morality tales reflects the Copp’s religious beliefs. Other highlights of the library include the works of Shakespeare, almanacs, historical and political texts, and travel narratives.
The Copp Collection contains a variety of household objects that the Copp family of Connecticut used from around 1700 until the mid-1800s. Part of the Puritan Great Migration from England to Boston, the family eventually made their home in New London County, Connecticut, where their textiles, clothes, utensils, ceramics, books, bibles, and letters provide a vivid picture of daily life. More of the collection from the Division of Home and Community Life can be viewed by searching accession number 28810.
Location
Currently not on view
Measurements
overall: 2 3/4 in x 8 9/16 in x 10 5/8 in; 6.985 cm x 21.7805 cm x 26.9875 cm
ID Number
DL.006866.21
catalog number
6866.21
accession number
28810
Credit Line
Gift of John Brenton Copp
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Domestic Life
Cultures & Communities
Copp Collection
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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