Gallenkamp Colorimeter

Description
A wedge colorimeter contains two hollow wedges, one holding the sample and the other holding the standard. By moving the wedges up and down, one can vary the depth of solution through which light passes. W. Gallenkamp obtained a German patent (#62560) for the basic form in 1891, and Hans Heele in Berlin made several instruments of this sort. Richards & Co. in New York offered a “Gallenkamp-Heele’s Colorimeter” in 1896, noting that it had a “direct scale of percentage” that permitted very accurate readings, was “especially adapted for sugar factories, dyeing establishments, etc.,” and cost $85.
This example is marked “D.R.-G.-M. Hans Heele, Berlin.” It was made before 1923 when Heele’s firm was bought by Bamberg. The Department of Chemistry at Yale University donated it to the Smithsonian in 1960.
Ref: Hans Heele, Heele-Gallenkamp Kolorimeter (Berlin, n.d.).
Location
Currently not on view
maker
Hans Heele
place made
Deutschland: Berlin, Berlin
Measurements
overall: 18 in; 45.72 cm
ID Number
CH.317270
catalog number
317270
accession number
229279
Credit Line
Yale University Department of Chemistry
subject
Optics
Color
Chemistry
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Chemistry
Measuring & Mapping
Saccharimeters
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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