Hart House Architectual Elements from Ipswich, Mass.

Description
The largest artifact in the museum, this Georgian-style, 2 ½-story timber-framed house was built in the 1760s and stood at 16 Elm Street in the center of Ipswich, Massachusetts, until 1963 when efforts by Ipswich citizens saved it from the bulldozer. The house was carefully taken apart—the frame, chimney, and many other pieces were shipped to the Museum and reassembled.
Today, the house is the centerpiece of the exhibition Within These Walls…, and visitors are able to peer through its walls, windows, and doors to view settings played out against the backdrop of Colonial America, the American Revolution, the abolitionist movement, the industrial era, and World War II. The exhibition tells the story of five ordinary families, selected from many, who lived in this house over 200 years and made history in their kitchens and parlors, through everyday choices and personal acts of courage and sacrifice.
Object Name
architectural elements, Hart House
Date made
ca. 1760s
ca 1760
resident
Caldwell, Josiah
Caldwell, Lucy
Choate, Abraham
Choate, Sarah
Dodge, Abraham
Dodge, Bethiah
Lynch, Catherine
Lynch, Mary
owner
Dodge, Abraham
Caldwell, Josiah
Choate, Sarah
Dodge, Bethiah
Caldwell, Lucy
Lynch, Catherine
Lynch, Mary
resident
Scott, Mary
owner
Choate, Abraham
Physical Description
wood (overall material)
metal (overall material)
georgian architectual style (overall style)
Place Made
United States: Massachusetts, Ipswich
ID Number
DL*64.545
catalog number
64.545
accession number
252318
subject
Family & Social Life
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Domestic Life
Exhibition
Everyday Life in the American Past
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Visitor Comments

11/14/2012 12:24:58 PM
Jesse Norton
My 11th great grandparents, Thomas and Alice Hart, built this house in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Their five children, including my 10th great grandmother, Sarah, grew up here. The other children were Thomas Jr., Samuel, Mary, and Mary (yes, two Marys!). Sarah married Captain George Norton and they had several children as well. Thomas Sr.'s mother, Elizabeth, was accused of witchcraft as an old lady and was sent to live in Boston. Thomas began a petition to absolve her of any accusations of witchcraft. It worked and she returned home only to pass away soon after. Thomas himself died not too long after his mother and was supposedly buried in the basement until he was removed later and interred in the Ancient Burial Ground in Ipswich, Mass (as well as his wife and possibly his parents). A kind of replica of the house is still located in Ipswich and is known as the 1640 Hart House. It is a restaurant. I hope to visit this exhibit as soon as the museum reopens. American history? This is my history!
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7/16/2013 3:03:15 PM
National Museum of American History
Your posting was forwarded to the Division of Home and Community Life. The exhibition "Within These Walls..." will reopen when the National Museum of American History reopens in 2008 after a major architectural renovation.