Log Book With Computer Bug

Log Book With Computer Bug

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Description
American engineers have been calling small flaws in machines "bugs" for over a century. Thomas Edison talked about bugs in electrical circuits in the 1870s. When the first computers were built during the early 1940s, people working on them found bugs in both the hardware of the machines and in the programs that ran them. 
In 1947, engineers working on the Mark II computer at Harvard University found a moth stuck in one of the components. They taped the insect in their logbook and labeled it "first actual case of bug being found." The words "bug" and "debug" soon became a standard part of the language of computer programmers.
Location
Currently not on view
Date made
1947
director
Aiken, Howard Hathaway
maker
Harvard University
IBM
Harvard University
Aiken, Howard
Place Made
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Physical Description
tape (overall material)
paper (overall material)
cloth (overall material)
ink (overall material)
biologicals (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 1.5 cm x 48.4 cm x 29.5 cm; 9/16 in x 19 1/16 in x 11 5/8 in
ID Number
1994.0191.01
catalog number
1994.0191.1
accession number
1994.0191
Credit Line
Transfer from United States Department of Defense, Naval Surface Warfare Center
subject
Computer Bug
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Computers
Military
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source
National Museum of American History

Comments

As a former sailor and Plankowner of her Namesake... the term Bug and debugging were both coined by none other that former "Amazing" Grace Hopper who would go on to become a Navy Admiral and serve nearly 4 decades in the U.S. Navy. She has a US warship named after her the USS HOPPER DDG-70. She was one of only 3 Female Admirals and would become a legend in the US Navy. She was retired and asked to come out of retirement on 3 separate occasions.
Has anyone identified the moth in question?
I'm sure it was documented somewhere before. A quick Internet search will yield results, I wager.

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