1850 -1875 Rachel Burr Corwin's Whole Cloth Tied Comforter

Four lengths of a cotton fabric with a palm-tree-and-pheasant design were used to create the top for this tied whole cloth comforter or counterpane. A color palate of blue and white on a dark brown ground was used for the roller-printed copy of an 1815 English block-print design. The lining, four lengths, is also a cotton roller-printed fabric of a striped geometric in brown, red, and white on a tan ground. A very thick layer of cotton was used for the filling. It is tied with white cotton. The Collection has other quilts made by Rachel Corwin.
Rachel Burr, daughter of Samuel Burr and Sibyl Scudder Burr of Massachusetts, was born March 3, 1788. She married Samuel Corwin of Orange County, New York, October 14, 1809. They had four children. Needlework examples by one of their daughters, Celia, are also in the Collection. Rachel Burr Corwin died March 14, 1849, in Orange County, New York.
Currently not on view
Object Name
date made
Corwin, Rachel Burr
Physical Description
fabric, cotton (overall material)
thread, cotton (overall material)
filling, cotton (overall material)
overall: 87 in x 83 in; 221 cm x 211 cm
place made
United States: New York, Middle Hope
ID Number
accession number
catalog number
Domestic Furnishings
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Textiles
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift of Mrs. Daniel Gardner

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