Whitall Tatum Paperweight

Description (Brief)
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
Whitall, Tatum & Company of Millville, New Jersey was formed in 1901 and employed first-rate craftsmen who created outstanding paperweights.
This Whitall, Tatum and Company pedestal paperweight features an opaque, rich yellow twelve-petal flower, freely suspended in a clear glass ball. The pointed center flower petals suggest that it is the work of glassmaker Emil Stanger.
date made
early 1900s
Whitall, Tatum and Company
place made
United States: New Jersey, Millville
Physical Description
glass, transparent (overall material)
overall: 3 11/16 in x 3 5/16 in; 9.398 cm x 8.382 cm
ID Number
catalog number
accession number
Credit Line
Aaron and Lillie Straus
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Wonder Place
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History