M. [Mary] Cook's Sampler

Description
Three block alphabets of 26 letters. Numbers to 9. Word "Marcellus" appears at end of one alphabet. Sampler worked in black silk with brown cotton used only for small period at ends of rows. Border of single row of long-armed cross at top, single row of herringbone on each side, single row of double cross at bottom. Silk thread on cotton ground. STITCHES: cross, long-armed cross, herringbone, eyelet, four-sided, crosslet, double cross. THREAD COUNT: warp 26, weft 26/in.
Inscriptions:
"With ink and pen.
These marks will give.
The lives of men.
To all that live.
Worked by M Cook.
August 1818."
Background:
Mary was born on February 22, 1806, to Daniel and Rebecca Pomeroy Cook in Skaneateles, New York. Daniel served in the Revolutionary War for three months at Saratoga in 1781, and died on August 3, 1806, in Marcellus, New York. Mary stitched her sampler while her family was living in Marcellus. She did not marry, and died on January 30, 1869. She is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, New York. The sampler descended in the family of her brother, Ira.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
sampler
Date made
1818
maker
Cook, Mary
Physical Description
cotton ( ground fabric material)
silk (embroidery thread material)
Measurements
overall: 8 5/8 in x 6 3/8 in; 21.9075 cm x 16.1925 cm
Place Made
United States: New York, Marcellus
associated place
United States: New York, Rochester
United States: California, San Rafael
ID Number
TE*T13201
catalog number
T13201
accession number
250307
subject
Textiles
Alphabets
Samplers
See more items in
Home and Community Life: Textiles
Samplers
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Gift of Miss Louise A. Boyd

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