Alexander Graham Bell Experimental Telephone

Description
Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated several experimental telephones at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. This unit features a single electro-magnet and could be used both as transmitter and receiver. Bell approached the problem of transmitting speech differently from other telephone inventors like Elisha Gray and Thomas Edison. They were mostly experienced telegraphers trying to make a better telegraph. Bell's study of hearing and speech more strongly influenced his work.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
experimental telephone
telephone
maker
Bell, Alexander G.
Physical Description
wood (base material)
brass (posts material)
tin (mouthpiece material)
brass (brackets material)
Measurements
overall: 6 1/2 in x 5 in x 11 in; 16.51 cm x 12.7 cm x 27.94 cm
ID Number
EM*252599
accession number
49064
catalog number
252599
patent number
174465
subject
Computers & Business Machines
Communications
Artifact Walls exhibit
See more items in
Work and Industry: Electricity
Artifact Walls exhibit
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Media

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