Burroughs Sensimatic Series 200

<< >>
Description
This full keyboard electric adding machine is in several pieces. The body with keyboard in mechanism has a tan metal frame with 14 columns of tan and brown keys, ten keys per column, and four columns of function keys. Three dials on the leftmost side of the machine can be used to set a date. A dial at the front of the machine alters a five-digit number read from five numeral dials next to it. The ribbon for the printing mechanism and the printing mechanism itself are above the keyboard. There also is a metal carriage mostly painted tan, with a rubber platen and plastic handles. A paper label inserted above the cylinder indicates quantities to be entered. A small nut is loose with the carriage.
In addition to these major pieces, there are a variety of plastic and metal parts, a roll of paper, and a gray plastic cover.
A red paper tag attached to the object reads: PATENT DEPT. (/) #327. A white paper tag reads: CASE NO 3473 (/) THIS MACHINE IS A (/) PATENT MODEL (/) AND SHOULD NOT BE USED (/) OPERATED OR LOANED TO ANYONE. The machine is marked on the frame: Burroughs Sensimatic. It is also marked there: Series 200. A metal tag attached to the object reads: DONATED TO (/) The Smithsonian Institution (/) by (/) Burroughs Corporation.
This was model #327 in the collection of the Patent Division of Burroughs Corporation. Burroughs made the Sensimatic from 1950 until 1961.
Location
Currently not on view
date made
ca 1950
maker
Burroughs Adding Machine Company
place made
United States: Michigan, Detroit
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
paper (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 27 cm x 40.7 cm x 52 cm; 10 5/8 in x 16 1/32 in x 20 15/32 in
ID Number
1982.0794.83
catalog number
1982.0794.83
accession number
1982.0794
Credit Line
Gift of Burroughs Corporation
subject
Mathematics
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Adding Machines
Data Source
National Museum of American History