Camera-ready comic strip, entitled Apartment 3-G

Description (Brief)
This pen-and-ink drawing produced for the Apartment 3-G comic strip shows the characters discussing how much they miss Peter. A new neighbor, named Newton Figg, is just arriving to move into 3-B, across the hall. Figg raises some eyebrows because he’s arriving with two oversized, stuffed animals named Wilbur and Wendell.
Alex Kotzky(1923-1996), while an art student in New York in 1940, became an assistant at DC Comics. In the 1950s he worked for publishers Quality Comics and Ziff-Davis. During this time he also ghost-drew for comic strips such as Steve Canyon and Big Ben Bolt. In 1961 he and writer-psychiatrist Nick Dallis began producing Apartment 3-G.
Apartment 3-G (1961- ) portrayed the lives of three young women who live together: art teacher Lu Ann Powers, nurse Tommie Thompson, and Margo Magee (who over time held different jobs). The soap opera-style comic includes the interactions of the three young women and their friendly, fatherly neighbor Professor Aristotle Papagoras.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
drawing
Object Type
Drawings
date made
1966-08-07
graphic artist
Kotzky, Alex
publisher
Publishers Newspapers Syndicate, Inc.
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 42 cm x 56.1 cm; 16 9/16 in x 22 1/16 in
ID Number
GA*22528
catalog number
22528
accession number
277502
subject
Family & Social Life
Art
Communications
Cultures & Communities
Popular Entertainment
Comic Art
See more items in
Culture and the Arts: Graphic Arts
Comic Art
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Newspaper Comics Council, Inc., New York, NY

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