Dessert Plate, SS United States

Description
This dessert plate was used aboard the SS United States, the largest and fastest passenger liner ever built in the United States. Launched in 1952, it was billed as the most modern and luxurious ship in service on the North Atlantic. This plate was one of the 125,000 pieces of chinaware supplied to the ship by the United States Lines. The china—a pattern featuring a ring of gray stars—was produced by Lamberton Sterling, an American manufacturer.
There were plenty of choices for dessert aboard the SS United States. Menus from a December 1954 voyage—the first taken by the Duke and Duchess of Windsor on an American vessel—reveal a combination of American favorites and fancy confections inspired by the French. For dinner on December 10, passengers enjoyed Old Fashioned Strawberry Shortcake, and Peach Melba, as well as Meringue Glace au Chocolat, Frangipan, and Petits Fours. For luncheon the next day, the choices ranged from Green Apple or Blueberry Pie to Biscuit Glace and Chocolate Éclairs.
Object Name
plate, dessert
date made
1950s
maker
Lamberton Sterling
Physical Description
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 1/4 in x 6 1/2 in; .635 cm x 16.51 cm
Associated Place
Atlantic Ocean
ID Number
TR*335565.06B
accession number
1978.2219
catalog number
335565.6b
subject
Food
Transportation
On the Water exhibit
event
Postwar United States
See more items in
Work and Industry: Maritime
On the Water exhibit
Exhibition
On the Water
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Credit Line
Transfer from US Department of Commerce, Maritime Administration (through R. J. Blackwell)
Publication title
On the Water online exhibition
Publication URL
http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthewater

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