Model of the 1866 Steam Locomotive Consolidation

<< >>
Description
This is a model of the Consolidation, the prototype for the most popular type of freight locomotive built in the United States. This locomotive model has two leading wheels, eight driving wheels, and no trailing wheels. It is therefore classified as a 2-8-0 locomotive, also known as the Consolidation-type. The design was so successful that more Consolidation-type engines were constructed than any other wheel arrangement. An estimated 33,000 were made for American railroads between 1866 and about 1930.
Alexander Mitchell, master mechanic of the Lehigh and Mahanoy Railroad, designed this locomotive to move heavy trains of anthracite over the steep inclines, or grades, of that line. The engine’s eight connected driving wheels provided ample power, and the two-wheel lead truck allowed the locomotive to round sharp curves at moderate speeds without derailing or damaging the track. Completed by Baldwin in July 1866, the Consolidation was named to commemorate the merger of the Lehigh and Mahanoy with the Lehigh Valley Railroad. The Consolidationwas retired in 1886 after operating nearly 377,000 miles.
Location
Currently on loan
date made
1962
used date
1866
maker
Severn-Lamb Ltd.
place made
United Kingdom: England, Stratford-upon-Avon
Associated Place
United States: Wyoming
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
wood (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 7 1/2 in x 5 in x 27 1/2 in; 19.05 cm x 12.7 cm x 69.85 cm
ID Number
TR.321452
catalog number
321452
accession number
242872
subject
Locomotives
Railroads
See more items in
Work and Industry: Transportation, Railroad
America on the Move
Transportation
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Comments

Add a comment about this object