Ship Model, Colonial Sloop

Description
During the period of North American colonization and early settlement, sloops formed the backbone of the trade along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and to the West Indies. They often sailed as smugglers and warships, too. This armed example from the late 1760s, with oars to maneuver in calms, is similar to craft used by Caribbean pirates a century earlier.
Little coastal sloops were the tractor-trailers of the colonial period, populating the waters along the eastern coast of North America right down to the Caribbean islands. Heavily built for bad weather and rough sea conditions, they were simple to sail, roomy for lots of cargo and passengers, easily handled by small crews, relatively swift, and usually armed for self defense wherever they might sail. They were also simple to build and inexpensive, so that if one were lost, it might not cause a crippling financial loss to its owners.
Object Name
sloop
model, rigged sloop
Date made
1960
date made
1768
maker
Arthur G. Henning Inc.
Physical Description
wood (overall material)
textile (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 9 in x 13 in x 5 in; 22.86 cm x 33.02 cm x 12.7 cm
Place Made
United States: New York, New York
United States: Virginia
ID Number
TR*318281
catalog number
318281
accession number
234477
subject
Transportation
Military
Work
Communications
Fishing
event
Revolution and the New Nation
See more items in
Work and Industry: Maritime
Exhibition
On the Water
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Publication title
On the Water online exhibition
Publication URL
http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthewater

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