Needle Bearing

Description
This needle bearing is already encased on a shaft mount for easy installation. Needle bearings are long, thin, cylindrical roller bearings with a high radial load capacity that are most used where space is limited. The Anti-Friction Bearing Manufacturers Association collected bearings for a public relations exhibit during the early 1950s, and donated them to the museum in 1977.
Bearings were used to reduce friction for thousands of years before late 19th century industrial production techniques made their use ubiquitous. Bearings reduce friction by facilitating radial and axial movement between surfaces, allowing heavy objects to move at high speeds while saving critical parts from the wear of friction. Bearings come in a variety of shapes and sizes (such as ball, roller, or tapered) and are commonly set in an inner and outer ring (called a race) sometimes with cages (separators) spacing the bearings. Changes to the size, shape, alignment, race, and cage allow for bearings to be used in almost any industry—from automobiles and airplanes to heavy machinery and hard drives.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
bearing
Measurements
overall: 2 1/4 in x 2 1/8 in; 5.715 cm x 5.3975 cm
ID Number
MC*336105.04
catalog number
336105.04
accession number
1977.0585
subject
Bearings
Industry & Manufacturing
See more items in
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Bearings
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Visitor Comments

Add a comment about this object

**Please read before submitting the form**

Have a comment or question about this object to share with the community? Please use the form below. Selected comments will appear on this page and may receive a museum response (but we can't promise). Please note that we generally cannot answer questions about the history, rarity, or value of your personal artifacts.

Have a question about anything else, or would you prefer a personal response? Please visit our FAQ or contact page.

Personal information will not be shared or result in unsolicited e-mail. See our privacy policy.

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.