Oil-Wick Miner’s Lamp Patent Model

Description (Brief)
This oil-wick cap lamp is a patent model constructed by William Pratt of Baltimore, Maryland that received patent number 18704 on November 24, 1857. The oil-wick cap lamp was first invented in Scotland in 1850 and in use until the 1920’s. The font contained a mix of fat and oil for fuel, and a wick was inserted into the spout. The resulting flame was much brighter and more efficient than the candles it replaced. This lamp has a handle rather than a hook, indicating it was meant to be held rather than worn on a cap.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
lamp, oil, mining
mining lamp
Measurements
overall: 3 1/2 in x 6 in x 3 in; 8.89 cm x 15.24 cm x 7.62 cm
ID Number
AG*MHI-MN-9735
catalog number
MHI-MN-9735
accession number
88881
patent number
018704
subject
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Natural Resources
Mining Lamps
See more items in
Work and Industry: Mining
Mining Lamps
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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