Microscope

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Description
John Marshall (1663-1725) was an optical instrument maker in London whose “Great Double Microscope” introduced in around 1693 was similar in many ways to Hooke’s instrument. A compound binocular with cardboard tube, wooden fittings, and screw focus, it attached to a pillar that sat atop a ball and socket joint. It had a glass stage, a sub-stage mirror, and a wooden based with drawer to hold accessories. The form remained popular throughout the century. The Smithsonian’s example is a replica based on the illustration in John Harris, Lexicon Technicum (London, 1704), art. “Microscopes.”
Ref: John Mayall, Cantor Lectures on the Microscope (London, 1886), pp. 36-37.
Reginald Clay and Thomas Court, The History of the Microscope (London, 1932), pp. 90-107.
Location
Currently not on view
date made
1936-1944
maker
Lucas, Joseph D.
place made
United States: Ohio, Cleveland
ID Number
MG.M-12223
catalog number
M-12223
accession number
271793
Credit Line
Mrs. Joseph D. Lucas
subject
Science & Scientific Instruments
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science & Mathematics
Microscopes
Data Source
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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