A cheerful Depression-era holiday greeting

A cheerful holiday greeting sent during the Great Depression? Isn't that somewhat contradictory?

Eyewitness to a "Day of Infamy": Commemorating Pearl Harbor

December 7, 2016, marks the 75th anniversary of the bombing of the Pearl Harbor naval base by the Japanese Imperial Navy. In commemoration of this anniversary, the museum has collected and digitized a series of letters written by a civilian, Beth Slingerland, as she watched the attack from her home in the hills above Pearl Harbor.

My ultrasound used to look like what?

Imagine walking into your doctor's office for your diagnostic ultrasound for ovarian screening, rounding the corner to the procedure room, and then taking off your clothes and submerging yourself up to your neck in a horse trough full of water. That's how some of the earliest doctors across the world envisioned using ultrasound to image the human body between the 1940s and 1960s. Ultrasound technology was first used by the U.S. military to determine tiny cracks in the hulls of metal ships, not to see into living human bodies. So in 1949 when British doctor John J.

More time for the party: A 1960s make-ahead potluck

Although Mad Men is over, we haven't stopped loving the 1960s. But how would our 2016 taste buds fare with 50-year-old recipes? We headed to the kitchen, turned up the bossa nova, and threw a '60s-themed potluck to experience the convenience of the rapidly growing 1960s fridge for ourselves.

Follow the yellow brick road, the Appalachian Trail, or your own path

Update: Thanks to you, our Kickstarter campaign to "Keep Them Ruby" was a success and we have the support we need to conserve and display Dorothy's Ruby Slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Stay tuned for updates on the project.

A multi-decade passion for a pair of red pumps

 

"… If I ever go looking for my heart's desire again, I won't look any further than my own backyard..."

Update: Thanks to you, our Kickstarter campaign to "Keep Them Ruby" was a success and we have the support we need to conserve and display Dorothy's Ruby Slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Stay tuned for updates on the project.

The power of the poppy: Exploring opium through "The Wizard of Oz"

Both the book and the film The Wizard of Oz feature iconic scenes of Dorothy, Toto, and the Cowardly Lion (the only flesh and blood members of the gang), lulled to sleep by a field of poisonous poppies. A deadly flower might seem curious at first, but poppies, of course, are no ordinary bloom.

The election of 1864 as seen through the Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Collection

As we near Election Day, political cartoons are inescapable. Satirical cartoons continue a tradition of political printmaking that has been part of American political life since pre-Revolutionary times. Political prints and comics experienced a golden age in the late 19th century, during the era of the famed pens of Thomas Nast of Harpers Weekly and Joseph Keppler of Puck. Known for their symbolism, exaggerated caricatures, and satirical commentary, historical prints can provide the modern American with a rich glimpse into the nation's polarized past.

Heart valves galore, to Tin Man's delight

In The Wizard of Oz, Tin Man longs for a heart. That's a problem Manuel "Manny" Villafaña has rarely had - he has collected pieces of many hearts.

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