Use it up!

“Leftovers” as a term originated  in the late 1890s. Food conservation campaigns during World War I urged their use, but not until the Great Depression in the 1930s did leftovers become a household obsession—a trend that continued during World War II. 

"Leftovers Shouldn't Be Left Over," Good Housekeeping magazine, 1930

Courtesy of Hearst Communications, Inc. 

"Leftovers Shouldn't Be Left Over" page 2

Courtesy of Hearst Communications, Inc. 

“Food waste in the household, the experts assert, results in large measure from . . . failing to serve and utilize food not consumed.”

–U.S. Department of Agriculture poster, 1917

Stacking leftover dishes, 1930s

Stacking leftover dishes, 1930s

Stacking leftover dishes, 1930s

Stacking leftover dishes, 1930s

General Electric logo on stacking leftover dishes, 1930s

General Electric logo on stacking leftover dishes, 1930s

WWI poster, 1917

WWI poster, 1917

Poster reads, "Food: 1. buy it with thought, 2. cook it with care, 3. use less wheat & meat, 4. buy local foods, 5. serve just enough, 6. use what is left...don't waste it."

WWII poster, about 1941

WWII poster, about 1941

Poster reads, "Join the ranks - fight food waste in the home. Buy to save. Serve to save. Store to save."